Emergency Medical Technology – Associate in Applied Science

The emergency medical technology program prepares students for employment as advanced emergency medical care givers. Content areas are covered in lectures; practical skills are developed in laboratory settings; and, clinical applications are divided between pre-hospital and hospital rotations. A 250-hour, non-paid externship experience with a local ambulance company is the capstone course for completion of the program requirement.

The curriculum meets the requirements of the Michigan Department of Michigan Department of Community Health and needs to be taken in sequence. Each course prepares the student for the respective level of the state licensing examination. Students are evaluated in three areas: content, practical skills and clinical performance. Students achieving an 80 percent or higher will receive a certificate of completion and be eligible for the state licensure. Practical skills are graded on a pass/fail basis, and students must pass all practical exams to successfully complete each course. Clinical performance is evaluated by attendance and feedback from ambulance and hospital personnel along with the clinical facilitator. Attendance policies are regulated by the state. Upon successfully completing all college requirements, a student will qualify for an Associate in Applied Science.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 76.75
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum grade in all EMS courses 2.5
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (28-29 credits)

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly (3 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly (3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning (4 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning (8 credits)

Choose one of the following groups:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 & MOA 141 Human Biology & Body Structure and Function 8

Human Biology

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

Body Structure and Function

This course is a body systems approach to the body structures and functions providing a foundation of understanding normal and abnormal body functions and disease processes.

BIO 132 & LPN 141 Human Biology & Body Structure and Function 8

Human Biology

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

Body Structure and Function

This course is a body systems approach to the body structures and functions providing a foundation of understanding normal and abnormal body functions and disease processes.

BIO 253 and 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8

Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them (4 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity (3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures (3-4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

ENG 236 Women In a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS SOC 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

ENG 242 Sports in Film and Literature 3 ENG 131

This course is an inquiry into historical and changing role of sports in American culture through novels, essays, biographies, films, documentaries and sports-related poetry.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 257 World Literature I 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students compare major themes and writers from Africa, America, Asia and Europe.

FRN 131 Elementary French I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

GER 131 Elementary German I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

HIS 125 African-American History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examines the role African-Americans have historically played in the political, economic and social construction of America.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 130 Music of Non-Western Cultures 3 ENG 085*

Discovering the music of non-Western cultures through lecture and directed listening.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

SOC 246 Marriage and Family 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The position and significance of marriage and the family in contemporary society are examined. Issues are examined within the larger political, historical and social context, including marriage and family values within diverse ethnic, minority and gender identity groups. SOC 231 recommended before enrolling in this course.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

CORE REQUIREMENTS (44.75 – 48.75 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 122 EMT Basic Technology 12 ENG 085* and MAT 020* Corequisites: EMS 1220 (Lab) and EMS 1221 (Clinical)

The basic emergency medical technician course is a Michigan Department of Community Health approved course. This program provides the information and experience necessary to prepare the student to sit for the National Registry Basic EMT Certification exam. Topics include: legal responsibilities, anatomy, physiology, patient assessment, management of various emergency situations, extrication, and current standards for EMTs in the field. Students will also participate in scenario-based education and computer-based testing and scenarios to reinforce skills learned within these areas. Students must complete a minimum of four 12-hour experiences in the hospital emergency room setting and with a pre-hospital life support agency. Laboratory and clinical experiences are included.

EMS 150 EMT Intermediate Technology (I-85) 8

The intermediate emergency medical technician (EMT-I) is a classroom and field-based emergency medical education program that prepares students to take the National Registry Intermediate EMT Certification exam. Students learn the role and responsibilities of an emergency medical technician at an intermediate level in providing emergency care. Content areas are covered in lectures, practical skills practiced in a laboratory setting along with observations and experience that will be gained in a clinical and/or internship setting.

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 160 Paramedic Advanced Practice: I 4.25 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 161, EMT 162, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as an advanced emergency medical technician (paramedic) in the State of Michigan. This course includes patient assessment techniques and concepts, advanced airway management, fluid and shock resuscitation, acid/base and body buffer systems, and multi-systems trauma treatments. Included in this course is a module on medical terminology. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and Jackson County Medical Control Authority.

EMS 161 Paramedic Skill Lab: I 2 Instructor Permission Required. Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 162, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) for the paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (both computer and classroom).

EMS 162 Paramedic Pharmacology: I 2.25 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 161, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to provide the paramedic students with a knowledge of basic pharmacological principles, biological factors influencing drug actions, predictable effects of drugs on physiologic problems, modifiers of predictable effects, commonalities and variations between the actions of drugs employed for comparable therapeutic effect, adverse effects of drugs that can and do commonly occur, and application for pharmacological therapy in the pre-hospital setting. Concentration will focus on cardiovascular drugs in this semester.

EMS 163 Paramedic Cardiology: I 2.25 Instructor Permission Required. Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 161, EMT 162 and EMS 166) This is a course designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the paramedic program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include: rapid interpretation of EKGs, static recognition of EKGs, electrical therapy, pharmacological therapy, and basic algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

EMS 164 Pediatric Advanced Life Support 2 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 174 and EMS 176) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills and knowledge to handle pediatric emergencies in the pre-hospital setting. Pediatric patients are not treated as “young” adults. They are a distinct population with different responses to injuries than adults.

EMS 166 Paramedic Clinical: I 3 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163 and EMS 164.

This course is designed to provide the first semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students.

EMS 170 Paramedic Advanced Practice: II 4.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 171, EMS 172, AND EMS 173) This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a paramedic in the State of Michigan. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Michigan Department of Community Health, and Jackson County Medical Control Authority. Topics include: advanced life support in gynecological emergencies, behavioral emergency management, gastrointestinal emergencies, lab test analysis, and other medical emergencies.

EMS 171 Paramedic Skill Lab: II 2 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 172 AND EMS 173) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) for the paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (both computer and classroom).

EMS 172 Paramedic Pharmacology: II 2.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 171 AND EMS 173) This course is designed to provide pharmacological information on the remaining non-cardiac drugs, which a paramedic will experience in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. This course is based on the paramedic education program requirements as set by the Michigan Department of Health.

EMS 173 Paramedic Cardiology: II 2.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 171 AND EMS 172) This course is designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the AEMT (paramedic) program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include pathophysiology of heart disorders, 12 lead EKG interpretation, pediatric ACLS and pharmacological therapy.

EMS 174 Paramedic Advanced Practice: III 4.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173 and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 164 and EMS 176) This course provides the paramedic student the knowledge in the transport of patients with special considerations and advanced EMT operations as prescribed in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s paramedic curriculum. Student will take a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of this course for certification by Jackson College. This certification can be used as evidence of completion for the National Registry Exam (passage of which leads to licensing in most U.S. states).

EMS 176 Paramedic Clinical: II 3 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173 and EMS 174

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 164 and EMS 174) This course is designed to provide the second semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students.

EMS 245 Paramedic Clinical Internship EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

This course is designed to provide the field internship as prescribed by Michigan Department of Transportation and the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health paramedic curriculum. This course is the last course taken as part of the paramedic program. This course includes clinical rotations at ambulance services as the lead paramedic under the supervision of a field paramedic. Students are expected to complete their clinical competencies during this class. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students. This course includes up to eight hours of medical simulation to help achieve any missing paramedic competencies.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 122 EMT Basic Technology 12 ENG 085* and MAT 020* Corequisites: EMS 1220 (Lab) and EMS 1221 (Clinical)

The basic emergency medical technician course is a Michigan Department of Community Health approved course. This program provides the information and experience necessary to prepare the student to sit for the National Registry Basic EMT Certification exam. Topics include: legal responsibilities, anatomy, physiology, patient assessment, management of various emergency situations, extrication, and current standards for EMTs in the field. Students will also participate in scenario-based education and computer-based testing and scenarios to reinforce skills learned within these areas. Students must complete a minimum of four 12-hour experiences in the hospital emergency room setting and with a pre-hospital life support agency. Laboratory and clinical experiences are included.

EMS 1220 EMS Lab

EMS Lab

EMS 1221 EMS Clinical

EMS Clinical

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

MOA 141 Body Structure & Function 4 ENG 085*

(SAME AS LPN 141) This course is a body systems approach to the body structures and functions providing a foundation of understanding normal and abnormal body functions and disease processes.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 160 Paramedic Advanced Practice: I 4.25 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 161, EMT 162, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as an advanced emergency medical technician (paramedic) in the State of Michigan. This course includes patient assessment techniques and concepts, advanced airway management, fluid and shock resuscitation, acid/base and body buffer systems, and multi-systems trauma treatments. Included in this course is a module on medical terminology. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and Jackson County Medical Control Authority.

EMS 161 Paramedic Skill Lab: I 2 Instructor Permission Required. Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 162, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) for the paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (both computer and classroom).

EMS 162 Paramedic Pharmacology: I 2.25 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 161, EMT 163 and EMS 166) This course is designed to provide the paramedic students with a knowledge of basic pharmacological principles, biological factors influencing drug actions, predictable effects of drugs on physiologic problems, modifiers of predictable effects, commonalities and variations between the actions of drugs employed for comparable therapeutic effect, adverse effects of drugs that can and do commonly occur, and application for pharmacological therapy in the pre-hospital setting. Concentration will focus on cardiovascular drugs in this semester.

EMS 163 Paramedic Cardiology: I 2.25 Instructor Permission Required. Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 164 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 215 WITH EMS 160, EMT 161, EMT 162 and EMS 166) This is a course designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the paramedic program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include: rapid interpretation of EKGs, static recognition of EKGs, electrical therapy, pharmacological therapy, and basic algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

EMS 164 Pediatric Advanced Life Support 2 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163 and EMS 166.

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 174 and EMS 176) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills and knowledge to handle pediatric emergencies in the pre-hospital setting. Pediatric patients are not treated as “young” adults. They are a distinct population with different responses to injuries than adults.

EMS 166 Paramedic Clinical: I 3 Instructor Permission Required Corequisites: EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163 and EMS 164.

This course is designed to provide the first semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 170 Paramedic Advanced Practice: II 4.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 171, EMS 172, AND EMS 173) This course is designed to prepare the student for licensure as a paramedic in the State of Michigan. The course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as prescribed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Michigan Department of Community Health, and Jackson County Medical Control Authority. Topics include: advanced life support in gynecological emergencies, behavioral emergency management, gastrointestinal emergencies, lab test analysis, and other medical emergencies.

EMS 171 Paramedic Skill Lab: II 2 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 172 AND EMS 173) This course is designed to provide the paramedic student with the skills as prescribed by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) for the paramedic curriculum. This course includes skill practice and scenarios (both computer and classroom).

EMS 172 Paramedic Pharmacology: II 2.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 171 AND EMS 173) This course is designed to provide pharmacological information on the remaining non-cardiac drugs, which a paramedic will experience in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. This course is based on the paramedic education program requirements as set by the Michigan Department of Health.

EMS 173 Paramedic Cardiology: II 2.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164, and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 225 WITH EMS 170, EMS 171 AND EMS 172) This course is designed to provide knowledge in cardiology to fulfill the needs of the AEMT (paramedic) program. This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment as stated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Michigan Department of Community Health, and the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support standards. Topics include pathophysiology of heart disorders, 12 lead EKG interpretation, pediatric ACLS and pharmacological therapy.

EMS 174 Paramedic Advanced Practice: III 4.25 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173 and EMS 176

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 164 and EMS 176) This course provides the paramedic student the knowledge in the transport of patients with special considerations and advanced EMT operations as prescribed in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s paramedic curriculum. Student will take a comprehensive exam at the conclusion of this course for certification by Jackson College. This certification can be used as evidence of completion for the National Registry Exam (passage of which leads to licensing in most U.S. states).

EMS 176 Paramedic Clinical: II 3 EMS 160, EMS 161, EMS 162, EMS 163, EMS 164 and EMS 166. Corequisites: EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173 and EMS 174

(FORMERLY EMS 235 WITH EMS 164 and EMS 174) This course is designed to provide the second semester clinical hours necessary to meet the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health Paramedic curriculum. This course includes clinical rotations at various sites including ambulance, hospital and skilled care facilities. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students.

SEMESTER 6

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 245 Paramedic Clinical Internship EMS 170, EMS 171, EMS 172, EMS 173, EMS 174, and EMS 176

This course is designed to provide the field internship as prescribed by Michigan Department of Transportation and the requirements of the Michigan Department of Community Health paramedic curriculum. This course is the last course taken as part of the paramedic program. This course includes clinical rotations at ambulance services as the lead paramedic under the supervision of a field paramedic. Students are expected to complete their clinical competencies during this class. In addition, classroom time is scheduled to review clinical procedures and review progress of the students. This course includes up to eight hours of medical simulation to help achieve any missing paramedic competencies.