Timeline of Jackson College

From the 1920s to the present day, Jackson College has offered educational opportunities to the people of Jackson County and southern Michigan. The College has continued to grow and adapt to the changing times, providing education necessary for today’s workforce and cultural and community opportunities to enrich lives.

Cool Timeline

Cool Timeline
1928
January 5

Local educators noticed the need for a two-year college in Jackson. There was a need for additional vocational training beyond high school, and students sought to go on to college to pursue four-year programs. Plans were completed early in 1928 for a new educational institution.
January 8

Jackson Junior College founded on Feb. 16, 1928, as part of Jackson Union School District, under the leadership of Edward O. Marsh, superintendent of the Jackson Union School District. The first home was an old mansion that had belonged to the Cowham family, west of the then-new Jackson High School. The young college also shared some facilities with the high school.
January 8

Jackson Junior College opens with a faculty of 10. The first year saw 113 students enrolled. Of these, however, only 34 were to graduate. The Depression, which began in fall of 1929, cut deeply into college enrollments across the country.
1930
January 8

In June, the Junior College hosted its first graduation ceremony in the Jackson High School Auditorium; 34 students graduated.
January 8

E.O. Marsh resigned due to health concerns; Harold Steele becomes replacement as superintendent, named also president in 1934. Steele serves until 1942.
January 8

College institutes athletics – including football. The school’s nickname is the “Maroons.” Its colors are maroon and old gold.
1933
January 8

Junior College receives accreditation from the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the first year it is eligible.
1935
January 8

College introduced a full range of courses in business and commercial skills.
1939
January 8

Despite the difficult days of the Great Depression, the young college held its own. By fall of 1939, enrollment had reached 327, with 50 coming from outside the Union School District and five more from out of state.
January 8

Civilian pilot training program course was added, under the direction of Frank Dove. This prepared many young men for aviation service in the armed forces.
1940
January 8

First Jackson Junior College graduating class holds a 10-year reunion with an anniversary dinner in Jackson.
1941
January 8

America’s entrance into World War II brought a sudden decline in JJC enrollment, which dropped 25 percent. In 1944, only 15 sophomores – all women – graduated.
1942
January 8

George L. Greenawalt, teacher, becomes superintendent of Jackson Union School District and president of the junior college. He served until 1952.
1945
January 8

During World War II, JJC men and women saw duty in every branch of service and in all corners of the globe. By war’s end, 39 of them had given their lives.
1946
January 8

College classes meet for the first time in John George Hall. Opening came just in time as veterans, returning to Jackson by the thousands, swelled the lists of applicants for admission and began a new era in the College’s history.
January 8

Jackson Junior College was the first school in its conference to introduce women cheerleaders; previously, only men were cheerleaders.
1952
January 8

Dr. William N. Atkinson named president of Jackson Junior College. Atkinson had previously served as dean at JJC.
1956
January 8

Jackson Junior College’s E.O. Marsh Hall is destroyed by fire following a lightning strike. College administrators faced with urgent problem of finding space for growth. (This site is now the Jackson High School parking lot).
1959
January 8

By the end of the decade, enrollments reached 1,100 students, highlighting the need for more space.
1961
January 8

A detailed study of the post-high school requirements of Jackson, Lenawee and Hillsdale county areas was completed with educators and civic leaders from all three counties. Findings showed that the three counties would be best served by creating a three-county community college and assuming control of Jackson Junior College. In an election on the issue, two of the counties turned the proposal down. Jackson County voters, long used to having a college in their midst, supported the measure two-to-one.
January 8

Jackson industrialist J. Sterling Wickwire offered the county some 270 of property to build the new college. However, because of the way the bequest was made, it did not work out for the college site. Wickwire’s bequest was left in such a way that the property could not be used at that time for construction of a campus; he donated the land over a period of time.
1962
January 8

Jackson County voters approve community college district, establishing Jackson Community College. Consideration was first given to a three-county community college district, including Lenawee and Hillsdale counties, but in an election, two of the counties turned the proposal down. Jackson County, long used to having the college in their midst, supported the measure two-to-one.
January 8

George E. Potter is elected to the first JCC Board of Trustees.
1964
January 8

County voters approve charter millage that still funds the College today. Voters approve a 1.3-mill tax to pay to operate the new JCC. Two earlier proposals were rejected by county voters.
January 8

Women’s Recreation Association of Michigan granted JJC permission to form a WRA on campus; basketball, volleyball, swimming, golf and tennis were offered to JJC coeds.
1965
January 8

College began countywide operation. After 37 years under the direction of Jackson’s Union School District board, the year marked the change from city to county control, becoming Jackson Community College with its own governing board, the six-member board of trustees chosen by the voters of the county.
January 8

The new Jackson Community College keeps its colors, maroon and old gold, but changes its nickname to “Golden Jets.”
January 8

53 students make history as first Jackson Community College graduates; alumnus Col. James A. McDivitt Jr., Gemini IV and Apollo VIII astronaut, delivers commencement address.
1966
January 8

Construction on new campus begins, with much fanfare.
1967
January 8

Justin R. Whiting Vocational-Technical Hall built. It was designed to serve the vocational and engineering areas of the community college program.
January 8

Classes are held for the first time at JCC’s new campus.
1969
January 8

James A. McDivitt Jr. Hall of Science, Campus Services buildings built.
January 8

Dr. Harold McAninch becomes president, 1969-71. He had previously served as vice president of instruction.
January 8

College connects with a three-computer complex operated by General Electric at Cleveland, Ohio. A program (or problem) was presented to one of the computers, and in about a quarter second, an answer came back. The service’s name was Fortran, the language for solving scientific-type problems. The College connected through a teletype machine. With the service, the College offered a new engineering course that fall, computer science.
1970
January 8

Fieldhouse, originally called the health services building, built
January 8

Women of Jackson Community College faculty and staff start the Harriet Myer Student Emergency Fund. Named in honor of Harriet Myer, counselor and former dean of women who had recently passed away, it was originally a fund to help female students. After a few years, help was extended to men as well. The fund assists students who may face smaller financial burdens – car repairs, gas, an unpaid utility bill – which may prevent a student from continuing their education.
1971
January 8

Bert Walker Hall built
1972
January 8

Harold Sheffer named president, 1972 – 1981. Sheffer guided the College through a time of growth in facilities and student enrollment.
1973
January 8

Dahlem Environmental Education Center opens; JCC science faculty and students helpful in organization.
1974
January 8

On the heels of the passage of Title IX in 1972, requiring equal education and athletic programs for men and women, JCC offers partial scholarships to 18 women athletes.
1976
January 8

Wickwire House damaged by fire; students form chain to help save contents.
1977
January 8

Potter Center construction begins; first phase finished in 1978, second phase with Music Hall in 1980. Facility was built to add meaning, scope and enrichment to lives of students and the life of the community.
January 8

Michigan Space and Science Center opens, commemorating Jackson’s connections with the Space Age.
January 8

Southern Michigan Law Enforcement Training Center, a policy academy program, conducted at the community college.
1979
January 8

College purchases a building that had housed Jackson Aviation at Jackson County Reynolds Airport to restart the aviation program. Aviation would offer associate degrees in aviation as well as private pilot flight training; 73 students were enrolled in the program.
1980
January 8

Women’s basketball team won conference, state and regional championships, went to Kansas City for nationals.
1981
January 8

Clyde LeTarte becomes president, 1981-1993. LeTarte helped spread the College’s reach with opening of campuses in Lenawee and Hillsdale counties.
January 8

Trustees vote to cut cross country and track, curtail sports travel and state tournament costs as part of $600,000 in budget cuts. In the early 1980s, Jackson County suffered an economic downtown; Jackson County suffered and Jackson Community College as well.
1982
January 8

In May, trustees voted to eliminate all remaining sports to save money in the budget.
1983
January 8

Jackson College Foundation formed. Since its inception, the Foundation, from its own assets and management of the College’s loaned funds, has offered thousands of dollars in support to the College, primarily in grants, programs and scholarships.
January 8

College launches Ultimate Runner contest, a series of running events for area athletes.
1984
January 8

JCC offers community entrepreneurial development program, a comprehensive course in small business planning.
1985
January 8

Jackson County Rose Run course moves to starting at Ella Sharp Park and ending at JCC campus.
January 8

Jackson’s Hot Air Jubilee weekend ends with Space Day held on campus at the Michigan Space and Science Center.
1986
January 8

First computer lab, a Mac Lab, opens. This was one of the first of its kind across Michigan. JCC also began incorporating technology in the classroom in other than specific computer classes.
1989
January 8

Lenawee Center opens in Adrian, in a location on Maple Avenue. Courses continued there for nearly 15 years, until the current site was built in 2003.
January 8

CARE (Concerned Adults Responding Early) program established. It was designed to offer school children in sixth grade a scholarship to JCC upon successful graduation from high school. College leaders wanted to give something back to the community and thought this would be a good start.
1990
January 8

Shift toward a “learning college” begins and takes root. This paradigm shift in education calls for institutions to make learning their highest priority.
1991
January 8

Hillsdale Center opens on Carleton Road. Previously, all classes were offered through adult education at Hillsdale High School.
1993
January 8

Robert L. Johnson Downtown Center opens on Cortland Street
2000
January 8

A 25-foot diameter spray of enamel and steel, Nova 8, by artist and Jackson-native Mark Muhich was donated by him and mother, Marjorie Muhich, in honor of Dr. Ralph Muhich. Dr. Muhich was a long-time Jackson psychiatrist who volunteered for five years as a reading tutor. Daughter Chris Davis, is a prior nursing instructor and current assistant dean of health professions at Jackson College.
January 8

The Hillsdale campus is dedicated in honor of former college president and state representative Clyde LeTarte for his service to the College and to the tri-county area.
2001
January 8

Daniel J. Phelan named president of JCC, continues to today. Phelan has overseen growth and renovation at all College locations.
2002
January 8

Spirit of America Flag Tribute dedicated on main campus. Flag display came about, in part, following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist incidents.
2003
January 8

JC @ LISD TECH built, next door to the Lenawee Vo-Tech Center. Center offers classroom, office and science laboratory and study spaces.
2005
January 8

James McDivitt Hall renovation completed. Classrooms, lecture halls and science laboratories all updated for today’s students.
2006
January 8

Sports return to campus; cross country in 2006, baseball, softball, men’s and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball in 2007.
2007
January 8

William Atkinson Hall built. Houses the library, information technology offices, classrooms and café.
January 8

Campus View 1 student housing built, offers students the opportunity to live on campus.
January 8

Hillsdale LeTarte Center renovation completed. Classrooms were updated, science laboratory space added and office spaces improved.
January 8

Victor Cuiss Fieldhouse renovation completed. With sports returning to campus, facilities were improved and a parquet wood floor put down in the gym.
2008
January 8

Rawal Center for Health Professions completed, Justin Whiting Hall. Provides prototype nursing and allied health laboratories.
2009
January 8

Campus View 2 student housing built
2011
January 8

Health Laboratory Center built. This facility offers laboratory spaces for nursing and allied health students, as well as classrooms, lecture hall, breakout study rooms and student lounges.
2012
January 8

The Jackson College Foundation purchased the former Photo Marketing Association International building in Jackson, on Blake Road near I-94, then leased it to the College to use as another site. The location was renovated and the North Campus established; facility would later be named in honor of alumnus William J. Maher.
2013
January 8

Board of Trustees vote to change name of institution to Jackson College. With the pending addition of two bachelor’s degree and an increased emphasis on international study, college leadership felt the time was right to change the name of the College.
2014
January 8

Bachelor of Science in Energy Systems Management approved, the first bachelor’s degree to be offered at the College. Degree prepares students for leadership careers in today’s energy and utility industry.
2015
January 8

Campus View 3, a third student housing unit, opens. Campus has capacity for nearly 500 students on campus.
January 8

Work begins on reconstruction, renovation of Bert Walker Hall, completion scheduled for 2016
2016
January 8

Renovated Bert Walker Hall rededicated, opens
2017
January 8

Bachelor of Applied Science in Culinary Management and Hospitality approved
January 8

College sees its first-ever bachelor’s degree graduate.