Culinary Management and Hospitality – Bachelor of Applied Science

Building on the foundation of culinary arts and hospitality associate degree, students will broaden their education with business and management courses for full-service careers in today’s food service and hospitality industries. While a passion for the art of cooking is important, good management and interpersonal skills are essential. Students may also earn chef certification through the American Culinary Federation (ACF) as well as the NRAEF ManageFirst and the ServSafe National Certification.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 140
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 30

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

SPN 132 Elementary Spanish II 4 SPN 131

Provides increased practice in the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

ACC 300 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry 4 ACC 216

Using a combination of management accounting and finance principles, develop your management skills in the area of financial management.  With an emphasis on management decision making, students will consider topics such as financial statement reporting and analysis, budgeting, forecasting, ethics, and internal controls.  Coursework and assignments will be structured to highlight the challenges and opportunities within the hospitality industry.

BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

BUA 315 Innovation, Branding and Strategic Marketing 3 BUA 230 and CUL 100

Students will analyze methods for creating innovative product and service offerings as part of an overall brand strategy for a hospitality establishment. This course will equip students with analytical tools used in developing brands to capture market share and adapt to ever-changing consumer preferences. A robust brand strategy aligns with an organization’s internal systems and culture. As a result, students will adopt the perspective of senior managers, considering the importance of team building, market research/product testing, competitive analysis, quality control/consistency, outsourcing, and complying with legal/regulatory requirements.

BUA 420 Project Management and Leadership 3 PHL 232, CIS 101 or CIS 201, ENG 131, and MAT 131* or higher

Students will experience and complete the entire project management process, from start to finish. Each student will create a project proposal, develop scope definitions, determine schedule, allocate resources, establish cost predictions, manage risk and critical path threats, communicate with stakeholders and closeout and document the project. Additional topics include building and leading project teams, utilizing industry project management software, and following the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) framework.

CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

PSY 344 Organizational Psychology 3 ENG 131 and PSY 140

Performance management and organizational change techniques based on principles of behavioral psychology. Environmental change strategies are emphasized. Topics include personnel management, employee motivation, job satisfaction, compensation strategies and practices, employee behavior and leadership.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CUL 100 Introduction to Hospitality 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

Students are exposed to the social, economic and environmental context within which the hospitality industry operates. Student will study the structure, nature and operating characteristics of the different sectors of the hospitality industry including food service, lodging and tourism. Students are also exposed to the various functions of management, their interrelationships with marketing, finance and human resource management. Students study the role of managers in the hospitality industry and highlight their principal responsibilities.

CUL 101 Servsafe Fundamentals 1

This course focuses on food safety risks encountered in the food service industry including the characteristics and causes the food-borne illnesses. Students are introduced to measures to prevent unsanitary conditions that cause food-borne illnesses, safte food handling, chemical use and storage, and management training tools. A study of the Michigan Food Law is incorporated into the class. Course completion involves passing the National Restaurant Assocation Education Foundation’s ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification Examination.

CUL 115 Baking & Pastry 3 CUL 114, ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

In this course students will produce classic and modern cakes, cookies, custards, chocolates, candies, hot and frozen desserts, classical plated desserts and centerpieces using several different mediums. Emphasis is on organization, sanitation, speed and presentation.

CUL 118 Nutrition for Food Service and Culinary 3 CUL 100, CUL 101, ENG 085, MAT 130 or higher

This course studies nutrients including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption and metabolism with application to normal and preventive nutrition needs, including nutrient intake analysis, energy expenditure evaluation and diet planning. Students recall and classify nutrient categories, their functions, digestion, absorption and metabolism; recommendations and nutrient categories; conduct personalized computerized nutrient analysis and calculate personalized energy needs; and plan a personalized diet according to the principles of the Exchange List System and the USDA Food Pyramid.

CUL 120 Culinary Skills 3 CUL 101 co-req, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students are introduced to the principles of quantity food production, fabricating techniques, recipe conversions, costing, product identification and classical culinary skills. Students learn to operate and care for equipment, along with maintaining a safe and sanitary environment.

CUL 121 Introduction to Food Production Techniques 3 CUL 111, CUL 120, ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This course will serve as an introduction to the basic concepts, techniques, terminology and methods involved in the preparation, presentation and portioning of various food and menu items. Students will rotate through the stations of a commercial kitchen gaining experience in knife skills, food production, food preparation, recipe understanding and the overall operation of a restaurant kitchen. This course will focus on à la carte, cooked to order foods as well as some quantity food production. Emphasis will be placed on the cookery process, food desserts, vegetables, salads, starches and entree preparations and also developing the proper techniques of plating and preparing desserts, vegetables, salads, starches and entree preparations.

CUL 150 Food Service Management 3 ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

Students are introduced to trends, organization and operations within the hospitality industry including tourism, lodging, restaurant, recreation and leisure, gaming, managed services, meeting/convention/exhibition, cruise, spa and resort segments.

CUL 175 International Cuisine 3 CUL 120, ENG 085, MAT 130 or higher

The development of world cuisine is a direct result of topography, location, climate and cultural influence. This hands-on course offers the student practical exposure and historical insight to the varied world cuisines of Europe, Asia and the Mediterranean, working from the roots of these civilizations to present day. As the particular aspects of regional ingredients and traditional cooking techniques are discovered, a rich source of inspiration is cultivated in future culinary professionals.

CUL 224 Food and Beverage Cost Control 3 CUL 101, CUL 120

Students are introduced to concepts of food, beverage and labor cost control systems to students preparing for careers in the food, beverage and hospitality industry. Students analyze costs related to food and beverage, labor and supplies used in the industry as well as exercises that are related to purchasing and receiving.

CUL 227 Contemporary Cuisine 3 CUL 121, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020

This course emphasizes supervision and management concepts, knowledge and skills of contemporary cuisine including menu selection, layout and design, on/off premise catering, entrepreneurship, small business management and nutrition. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUL 231 À la Carte Kitchen 3 CUL 121, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

The focus is on modern, contemporary and classical cuisine for service in restaurants. Correct applications and fundamentals of culinary skills, quantity food production and organization, mise en place, cooking methods, improved knife skills, plate presentation and the use of standardized recipes will be stressed. Students prepare à la carte salads, dressings, marinades, vegetables, starches and entrees. Students hone their skills to be both creative in preparation and food presentation approaches.

CUL 245 Internship I 1 CUL 100, CUL 101, CUL 120, CUL 115, CUL 121

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 60 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

CUL 250 Principles of Beverage Service 3 CUL 101

This course focuses on the study of the beverage service in the hospitality industry which includes spirits, wines, beers and non-alcoholic beverages. Topics include purchasing, resource control, legislation, marketing, physical plant requirements, staffing, service and the selection of wines to enhance foods. Students complete the ServSafe Alcohol training and national examination. Must have Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management associate degree (CUR.AAS) as active program of study to enroll.

CUL 345 Internship II 3 CUL 245

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 180 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

CUL 445 Internship III 3 CUL 345

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 180 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

CUL 455 Capstone Externship and Practicum 3 CUL 100, CUL 101, CUL 120, CUL 115, CUL 121, CUL 245, CUL 345, CUL 445

The capstone internship/practicum is a hands-on, interactive practicum in which students will experience the operations of a hotel/resort, or hotel/casino environment.  Students will complete back-of-the-house training, and front-of-the-house training (front desk, housekeeping, engineering, HR, food and beverage, meeting and convention space, sales and marketing, and recreation operations). Proficiency in each of these operations is required for successful completion of the program.

HTM 300 Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality 3 BUA 220

Students will explore careers and components of the tourism and hospitality industries, inclusive of lodging, restaurants, recreation/theme parks, clubs/gaming, and entertainment and events. Using the hospitality perspective, many business principles will be covered, such as: leadership, management, planning, organization, communication, decision-making, and quality control.

HTM 305 Hospitality Facilities Management 3 CUL 100, BUA 220, ENG 232, STM 101

This course offers an overview of the operation of hospitality facilities, including operating costs for various types of facilities, types and characteristics of major building systems, sustainable aspects of building equipment and management, and the responsibilities of the engineering maintenance department. The study of technology, that aids renovation needs, will be explored so as to streamline operation procedures and key managerial aspects of hospitality facility maintenance.

HTM 313 Hospitality Ethics 3 CUL 100, BUA 220, ENG 232

Students will develop theoretic lenses for understanding ethical issues that confront management in the hospitality and tourism industry while cultivating practical tools for accomplishing personal and organizational goals, and equally exploring how those issues might be handled in ethically defensible ways. This will chiefly be accomplished by way of case studies, self-assessments, experiential exercises, reading, discussion, papers and group activities.

HTM 320 Club and Special Event Management 3 CUL 100, CUL 150, BUA 220

This course explores the management of, and leadership roles within, private city, country, and athletic clubs. Topics include: the general manager function; organizational structure of clubs; membership requirements; the future of clubs; and the relationship of private clubs to the hospitality industry. Students will examine the production and execution of special events, focusing on planning, developing, managing, and implementing all types of events, such as festivals, entertainment, corporate, cultural, and sporting events.

HTM 325 Gaming and Convention Sales Management 3 CUL 100, CUL 150, BUA 220

This course is designed to focus on the planning and managing of events, meetings and conventions. Students will cover the basic techniques and processes behind event planning and meeting management. Emphasis will be given on technical, financial, operational and implementation skills, as well as identifying legal and strategic requirements. Furthermore, the student will be introduced to the multi-billion-dollar gaming industry. Topics include a historical overview of gaming and examines legal, social, and economic issues within the industry. It also reviews the various games played in casinos, current trends, and most popular casino destinations in the world.

HTM 330 Hospitality and Sales Marketing 3 BUA 230

Students analyze the hospitality and tourism industry to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective marketing strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on evaluating hospitality/tourism environments, identifying target markets, building brands, and the marketing functions of defining the product, pricing, promotion (direct and online) and placement/sales.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CUL 100 Introduction to Hospitality 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

Students are exposed to the social, economic and environmental context within which the hospitality industry operates. Student will study the structure, nature and operating characteristics of the different sectors of the hospitality industry including food service, lodging and tourism. Students are also exposed to the various functions of management, their interrelationships with marketing, finance and human resource management. Students study the role of managers in the hospitality industry and highlight their principal responsibilities.

CUL 101 Servsafe Fundamentals 1

This course focuses on food safety risks encountered in the food service industry including the characteristics and causes the food-borne illnesses. Students are introduced to measures to prevent unsanitary conditions that cause food-borne illnesses, safte food handling, chemical use and storage, and management training tools. A study of the Michigan Food Law is incorporated into the class. Course completion involves passing the National Restaurant Assocation Education Foundation’s ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification Examination.

CUL 120 Culinary Skills 3 CUL 101 co-req, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students are introduced to the principles of quantity food production, fabricating techniques, recipe conversions, costing, product identification and classical culinary skills. Students learn to operate and care for equipment, along with maintaining a safe and sanitary environment.

MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

CUL 115 Baking & Pastry 3 CUL 114, ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

In this course students will produce classic and modern cakes, cookies, custards, chocolates, candies, hot and frozen desserts, classical plated desserts and centerpieces using several different mediums. Emphasis is on organization, sanitation, speed and presentation.

CUL 121 Introduction to Food Production Techniques 3 CUL 111, CUL 120, ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This course will serve as an introduction to the basic concepts, techniques, terminology and methods involved in the preparation, presentation and portioning of various food and menu items. Students will rotate through the stations of a commercial kitchen gaining experience in knife skills, food production, food preparation, recipe understanding and the overall operation of a restaurant kitchen. This course will focus on à la carte, cooked to order foods as well as some quantity food production. Emphasis will be placed on the cookery process, food desserts, vegetables, salads, starches and entree preparations and also developing the proper techniques of plating and preparing desserts, vegetables, salads, starches and entree preparations.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

CUL 118 Nutrition for Food Service and Culinary 3 CUL 100, CUL 101, ENG 085, MAT 130 or higher

This course studies nutrients including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption and metabolism with application to normal and preventive nutrition needs, including nutrient intake analysis, energy expenditure evaluation and diet planning. Students recall and classify nutrient categories, their functions, digestion, absorption and metabolism; recommendations and nutrient categories; conduct personalized computerized nutrient analysis and calculate personalized energy needs; and plan a personalized diet according to the principles of the Exchange List System and the USDA Food Pyramid.

CUL 245 Internship I 1 CUL 100, CUL 101, CUL 120, CUL 115, CUL 121

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 60 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CUL 175 International Cuisine 3 CUL 120, ENG 085, MAT 130 or higher

The development of world cuisine is a direct result of topography, location, climate and cultural influence. This hands-on course offers the student practical exposure and historical insight to the varied world cuisines of Europe, Asia and the Mediterranean, working from the roots of these civilizations to present day. As the particular aspects of regional ingredients and traditional cooking techniques are discovered, a rich source of inspiration is cultivated in future culinary professionals.

CUL 224 Food and Beverage Cost Control 3 CUL 101, CUL 120

Students are introduced to concepts of food, beverage and labor cost control systems to students preparing for careers in the food, beverage and hospitality industry. Students analyze costs related to food and beverage, labor and supplies used in the industry as well as exercises that are related to purchasing and receiving.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

CUL 150 Food Service Management 3 ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

Students are introduced to trends, organization and operations within the hospitality industry including tourism, lodging, restaurant, recreation and leisure, gaming, managed services, meeting/convention/exhibition, cruise, spa and resort segments.

CUL 231 À la Carte Kitchen 3 CUL 121, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

The focus is on modern, contemporary and classical cuisine for service in restaurants. Correct applications and fundamentals of culinary skills, quantity food production and organization, mise en place, cooking methods, improved knife skills, plate presentation and the use of standardized recipes will be stressed. Students prepare à la carte salads, dressings, marinades, vegetables, starches and entrees. Students hone their skills to be both creative in preparation and food presentation approaches.

CUL 250 Principles of Beverage Service 3 CUL 101

This course focuses on the study of the beverage service in the hospitality industry which includes spirits, wines, beers and non-alcoholic beverages. Topics include purchasing, resource control, legislation, marketing, physical plant requirements, staffing, service and the selection of wines to enhance foods. Students complete the ServSafe Alcohol training and national examination. Must have Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management associate degree (CUR.AAS) as active program of study to enroll.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

SEMESTER 6

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

CUL 345 Internship II 3 CUL 245

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 180 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

SEMESTER 7

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

CUL 227 Contemporary Cuisine 3 CUL 121, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020

This course emphasizes supervision and management concepts, knowledge and skills of contemporary cuisine including menu selection, layout and design, on/off premise catering, entrepreneurship, small business management and nutrition. Laboratory demonstrations and student experimentation parallel class work.

CUL 445 Internship III 3 CUL 345

The internship offers students the opportunity to put learned theory to practice, while working in a paid or unpaid culinary related internship environment, involving employer(s) and departmental instructional staff. Students are required to complete a minimum of 180 hours and complete a portfolio on the internship. Periodic conferences between the site supervisor and Jackson College internship coordinators are scheduled to monitor and evaluate student progress. Students are responsible for identifying their own internship site. Lists of potential internship sites will be available through the Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management Department. Students must have permission of the department head and attend an internship orientation meeting before registering for this course.

SPN 132 Elementary Spanish II 4 SPN 131

Provides increased practice in the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

SEMESTER 8

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

SEMESTER 9

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
HTM 305 Hospitality Facilities Management 3 CUL 100, BUA 220, ENG 232, STM 101

This course offers an overview of the operation of hospitality facilities, including operating costs for various types of facilities, types and characteristics of major building systems, sustainable aspects of building equipment and management, and the responsibilities of the engineering maintenance department. The study of technology, that aids renovation needs, will be explored so as to streamline operation procedures and key managerial aspects of hospitality facility maintenance.

HTM 320 Club and Special Event Management 3 CUL 100, CUL 150, BUA 220

This course explores the management of, and leadership roles within, private city, country, and athletic clubs. Topics include: the general manager function; organizational structure of clubs; membership requirements; the future of clubs; and the relationship of private clubs to the hospitality industry. Students will examine the production and execution of special events, focusing on planning, developing, managing, and implementing all types of events, such as festivals, entertainment, corporate, cultural, and sporting events.

HTM 325 Gaming and Convention Sales Management 3 CUL 100, CUL 150, BUA 220

This course is designed to focus on the planning and managing of events, meetings and conventions. Students will cover the basic techniques and processes behind event planning and meeting management. Emphasis will be given on technical, financial, operational and implementation skills, as well as identifying legal and strategic requirements. Furthermore, the student will be introduced to the multi-billion-dollar gaming industry. Topics include a historical overview of gaming and examines legal, social, and economic issues within the industry. It also reviews the various games played in casinos, current trends, and most popular casino destinations in the world.

SEMESTER 10

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 300 Financial Management for the Hospitality Industry 4 ACC 216

Using a combination of management accounting and finance principles, develop your management skills in the area of financial management.  With an emphasis on management decision making, students will consider topics such as financial statement reporting and analysis, budgeting, forecasting, ethics, and internal controls.  Coursework and assignments will be structured to highlight the challenges and opportunities within the hospitality industry.

HTM 300 Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality 3 BUA 220

Students will explore careers and components of the tourism and hospitality industries, inclusive of lodging, restaurants, recreation/theme parks, clubs/gaming, and entertainment and events. Using the hospitality perspective, many business principles will be covered, such as: leadership, management, planning, organization, communication, decision-making, and quality control.

HTM 313 Hospitality Ethics 3 CUL 100, BUA 220, ENG 232

Students will develop theoretic lenses for understanding ethical issues that confront management in the hospitality and tourism industry while cultivating practical tools for accomplishing personal and organizational goals, and equally exploring how those issues might be handled in ethically defensible ways. This will chiefly be accomplished by way of case studies, self-assessments, experiential exercises, reading, discussion, papers and group activities.

HTM 330 Hospitality and Sales Marketing 3 BUA 230

Students analyze the hospitality and tourism industry to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective marketing strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on evaluating hospitality/tourism environments, identifying target markets, building brands, and the marketing functions of defining the product, pricing, promotion (direct and online) and placement/sales.

SEMESTER 11

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 315 Innovation, Branding and Strategic Marketing 3 BUA 230 and CUL 100

Students will analyze methods for creating innovative product and service offerings as part of an overall brand strategy for a hospitality establishment. This course will equip students with analytical tools used in developing brands to capture market share and adapt to ever-changing consumer preferences. A robust brand strategy aligns with an organization’s internal systems and culture. As a result, students will adopt the perspective of senior managers, considering the importance of team building, market research/product testing, competitive analysis, quality control/consistency, outsourcing, and complying with legal/regulatory requirements.

BUA 420 Project Management and Leadership 3 PHL 232, CIS 101 or CIS 201, ENG 131, and MAT 131* or higher

Students will experience and complete the entire project management process, from start to finish. Each student will create a project proposal, develop scope definitions, determine schedule, allocate resources, establish cost predictions, manage risk and critical path threats, communicate with stakeholders and closeout and document the project. Additional topics include building and leading project teams, utilizing industry project management software, and following the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) framework.

COM 350 Intercultural Communication for Management 3 COM 231 or 240 and ENG 131

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively. This course is tailored for those students seeking management/leadership positions and the unique needs of cross-cultural communication in those areas.

PSY 344 Organizational Psychology 3 ENG 131 and PSY 140

Performance management and organizational change techniques based on principles of behavioral psychology. Environmental change strategies are emphasized. Topics include personnel management, employee motivation, job satisfaction, compensation strategies and practices, employee behavior and leadership.

SEMESTER 12

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CUL 455 Capstone Externship and Practicum 3 CUL 100, CUL 101, CUL 120, CUL 115, CUL 121, CUL 245, CUL 345, CUL 445

The capstone internship/practicum is a hands-on, interactive practicum in which students will experience the operations of a hotel/resort, or hotel/casino environment.  Students will complete back-of-the-house training, and front-of-the-house training (front desk, housekeeping, engineering, HR, food and beverage, meeting and convention space, sales and marketing, and recreation operations). Proficiency in each of these operations is required for successful completion of the program.