Electronic Technology Microcomputer – Associate in Applied Science

Electronic technologists are employed in such fields as digital computer maintenance, voice and data communications, radio and television broadcasting, medical electronic instrumentation, high-tech manufacturing, research and development in laboratory settings. Students may also work to achieve A+ certification for employment as personal computer service professionals. A+ certification is the “journeyman’s card” for computer technologists, which is recognized by CompTIA. The non-profit Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) is widely recognized as the standard for qualified computer service professionals.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 77
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 110 Introductory Biology 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Students will investigate the nature of science and critically analyze scientific data. Basic biological concepts including cancer, biostatistics, organic molecules and nutrition, biotechnology, nutrient cycles, and evolution are presented in the context of current issues. This course includes a discussion component which involves reading, critically evaluating, and discussing scientific papers: thus strong college reading and writing skills are recommended. The course is designed for non-science majors and includes a laboratory component.

CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 131 Conceptual Physics 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Become familiar with basic concepts used in physics to describe and explain various physical phenomena. The course covers the following topics: kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics (the study of force, momentum and energy); the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the basics of physics using a minimum of mathematics. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CIS 160 Programming in Visual Basic.NET 3 CIS 095* and MAT 020* or higher

This course introduces students to principles and concepts of programming in a Windows® environment using the Visual Basic.NET programming language. Students learn to develop business applications by designing and creating a user interface and writing the necessary procedures using both structured and object-oriented design. Topics covered include objects, variables, menus, arrays, file input/output, OLE methods, and debugging. Recommended computer programming majors take CIS 158 prior to this course.

CIS 170 Programming in C++ 3 CIS 095* and MAT 033* or higher

(SAME AS CPS 177) Students study digital computing systems and how they are used to solve problems. Students use procedural and object-oriented programming capabilities to design, develop, and test computer programs. Topics covered include program development, functions, control structures, text file operations, classes, recursion, arrays and pointers.

Plus up to 4 credits from any ELT, CIS or CNS course that best meets your educational goals.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

CIS 105 Microsoft® Windows® Workshop 1

(FORMERLY CIS 012) This course provides a basic introduction to Microsoft® Windows®. The fundamentals of Microsoft Windows will be covered which include the start menu, desktop, launching an application program and using help and support. File and folder management, control panel and using the taskbar will be introduced.

CIS 106 Operating System: UNIX 1

(FORMERLY CIS 013) This course is an overview of the UNIX operating system, commands, batch files and other basic topics. Typing ability is necessary to be successful in this course.

CIS 107 Microsoft® DOS® Workshop 1

(FORMERLY CIS 016) Learn the IBM® (or equivalent) personal computer and its components. This course covers the operating systems background, Disk Operating System (DOS®) commands, tree structure, EDLIN, Microsoft® – DOS®.

CIS 174 PC Repair/A+ Hardware Component 3

Course covers basic computer theory, logic, technological evolution, fundamental PC components, I/O peripheral identification, implementation, functionality, and printer fundamentals/types/diagnostics/troubleshooting/basic repair.

CIS 175 PC Repair/A+ Software Component 3 CIS 174

Students gain familiarization with basic DOS functionality and manipulation for diagnostics, troubleshooting and repair with Windows® O/S. Installation, configuration, troubleshooting, diagnostics, upgrade familiarity with necessary Microsoft® product for A+ certification.

CIS 176 A+ Certification Exam Preparation 1 CIS 175

Focus on A+ core exam module component essentials/fundamentals, includes real-time test environment and materials.

CIS 179 Network+ Certification Exam Preparation 1 CNS 101

Focus on Network+ core exam module component essentials/fundamentals to include real-time test environment and materials.

CNS 101 Network Fundamentals/Network+ 4

This course introduces students to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. It is the first of four courses that help prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification exam. The course materials will assist in developing the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications. It also helps prepare the student for the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

ELT 120 Circuit Analysis I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Students examine the fundamental concepts of DC circuits including electricity and magnetism, resistance, capacitance, inductance, series and parallel circuits, power and basic electrical measurements.

ELT 126 Circuit Analysis II 4 ELT 120

A study of alternating electrical current is presented. Topics include AC measurements, resistance, inductance and capacitance in AC circuits.

ELT 130 Electronics I 4 ELT 126

Study of electronic devices including diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, integrated circuits, and other semiconductor devices; their parameters, nomenclature, characteristics, and application to practical circuitry.

ELT 140 Introduction to Digital Electronics 4 ENG 085 and MAT 020* or higher

This course is the beginning course in digital electronics. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, and basic logic gates and circuits.

ELT 245 Internship 3 Instructor Permission Required

The student will have meaningful work experience related to electronic technology with an appropriate organization. The organization and position must be approved by supervising faculty member.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

CIS 201 Advanced Information Technologies 3 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and CIS 101*

(SAME AS ECM 201) This course enhances electronic communication skills and computer concepts essential to using current advanced information technologies. Topics include web collaboration, web conferencing, web 2.0 applications, social media, mobile computing, file conversions and cross-platform compatibility.