Occupational Studies – Associate in Applied Science

This Associate of Applied Science is designed specifically for students who have completed an apprenticeship program and received a certificate of completion from the U.S. Department of Labor/Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training. Apprenticeship occupations accepted are carpenter, cement mason, structural draftsman, machine builder, machine repair and maintenance, millwright, wood model maker, mold maker (plaster and die cast), operating engineer, plumber, pipe fitter, tool and die maker. Other apprenticeship programs would need to be reviewed on a case-by-case for consideration by the lead faculty. The curriculum will provide students with a strong academic foundation and introduce them to new ideas in sustainability, business, entrepreneurship and computer systems.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 60
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 110 Introductory Biology 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Students will investigate the nature of science and critically analyze scientific data. Basic biological concepts including cancer, biostatistics, organic molecules and nutrition, biotechnology, nutrient cycles, and evolution are presented in the context of current issues. This course includes a discussion component which involves reading, critically evaluating, and discussing scientific papers: thus strong college reading and writing skills are recommended. The course is designed for non-science majors and includes a laboratory component.

CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 131 Conceptual Physics 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Become familiar with basic concepts used in physics to describe and explain various physical phenomena. The course covers the following topics: kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics (the study of force, momentum and energy); the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the basics of physics using a minimum of mathematics. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

ECM 101 eCommerce Fundamentals 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

The course introduces revenue models for conducting business transactions globally with customers over the Internet. Topics include integrating eBusiness strategies with traditional store-front objectives, procuring hardware and software resources, optimizing web marketing opportunities, and complying with legal, ethical and regulatory restrictions. Student will apply concepts to real-life scenarios through active-learning strategies.

ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

ENT 101 Entrepreneurship: Creating Your Own Job 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

There will be only one constant throughout your career, and that constant is change. The preferences of consumers are constantly changing, entire industries are rising and falling, and hard-working people often are finding themselves looking for a job. This course provides you with the foundation to design your own job, whether in the context of an existing organization (i.e., as an “intrapreneur”) or as someone who starts a new enterprise (i.e., as an “entrepreneur”). In this course you will learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses, as well as the key characteristics shared by successful entrepreneurs. You’ll also gain skills for matching your strengths with a business idea that fits you well, so that both you and your customers will benefit. Finally, you will begin developing analytical tools to help make sound decisions in a rapidly-changing world.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

ELECTIVES

Apprenticeship Certificate of Completion. Other apprenticeship/certificate programs would need to be reviewed on a case-by-case for consideration by the lead faculty.