Pre-Professional Science – Certificate

The Pre-Professional Science Certificate prepares students to transfer to four-year institutions either as science majors or as pre-professional students (pre-vet, pre-med, pre-dental, physical and occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physician’s assistant, etc.). Certificate graduates could also find employment as laboratory technicians. The certificate fulfills most of the first-year academic entrance requirements for pre-professional programs. Students should verify information with their transfer institutions.

Gainful Employment

Program Requirements

Minimum credits 30
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 141 Pre-Calculus 5 MAT 139*

Major emphasis is on the concept of functions. Study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, their properties, graphs, and related equations and applications. Additional topics include systems of equations, matrices, conic sections, sequences and series, and probability. A graphing calculator is required and used extensively. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 151 Calculus I 4 MAT 141*

(FORMERLY MTH 151) First calculus course for business, mathematics, engineering and science students explores introductory plane analytic geometry, the derivative, the integral and their applications for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

PHL 232 Logic 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course gives you a background in both informal and formal logic. Informal logic, which is derived from everyday types of discussions and arguments, is dealt with first. Topics included are the nature of arguments in general, statistical arguments, and fallacies (bad arguments). Formal logic involves dealing with arguments in an artificial language and is the ancestor of digital computers and every computer programming language. You will learn how to manipulate the artificial language and construct relatively simple proofs.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Choose four of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 161 General Biology I 4 ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Biology 161 is the first semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers nature of science, a survey of the major groups of living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants and animals), the process and evidence for evolution, and the fundamentals of ecology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 162 General Biology II 4 CEM 131 or higher

Biology 162 is the second semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers the chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, molecular and Mendelian genetics, cell division, gene regulation and biotechnology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component. Successful completion of BIO 161 is recommended prior to enrollment .

CEM 141 General Chemistry I 5 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 131* or higher

This course is required for most sciences, engineering, and pre-professional health majors. Students who are required to take organic chemistry for their major should enroll in CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry. Course includes a laboratory component.

CEM 142 General Chemistry II 5 CEM 141

This course is the second semester of general chemistry and extends material covered in CEM 141. Covered concepts include chemical thermodynamics, electrochemical reactions, reaction kinetics, acid-base theories, nuclear chemistry, and aqueous solutions with emphasis on equilibrium. Experiments include quantitative methods, stoichiometry, colorimetry, and gravimetric analysis. Course includes a laboratory component.

MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 151 Calculus I 4 MAT 141*

(FORMERLY MTH 151) First calculus course for business, mathematics, engineering and science students explores introductory plane analytic geometry, the derivative, the integral and their applications for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 154 Calculus II 5 MAT 151*

(FORMERLY MTH 154) This course explores the following topics: methods and applications of the derivative and integral for inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, indeterminate forms, series and polar/parametric representation of functions. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, the recommendation is the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

PHY 231 College Physics I 4 MAT 131 or higher

Pre-professional and engineering technology students explore kinematics, mechanics, dynamics, thermodynamics, acoustics and general wave motion. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 251 Modern University Physics I 5 MAT 151 or higher

Students cover classical mechanics, thermodynamics and wave motion. This course should be elected by all science and engineering students. Course includes a laboratory component.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 231 General Botany 4 BIO 110, BIO 161 or BIO 162

(FORMERLY BIO 151) Emphasizes the development, anatomy, physiology and evolution of angiosperms. A survey of the plant kingdom with representative life cycles stresses relationships among plant groups. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 232 General Zoology 4 BIO 110, BIO 161 or BIO 162

(FORMERLY BIO 152) A comparative study of the anatomical and evolutionary relationships of the major animal phyla with emphasis on development, structure and function of vertebrate systems. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 253

This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

CEM 241 Organic Chemistry I 5 CEM 142

Comprehensive study of the major classes of organic compounds, their structures and reactions. The stero-chemical properties and spectra (IR and NMR) of molecules and their mechanisms of reactions are stressed. The laboratory experiments demonstrate techniques used in organic reactions, syntheses illustrating types of reactions, analysis of major classes of compounds, and kinetic studies.