Articulation Agreements

Articulation agreements are formal signed agreements between colleges and universities so students can be sure that what they take at Jackson College will meet the program requirements of where they transfer. Generally, public universities do not sign articulation agreements but use transfer guides and transfer equivalencies to help students know what to take. Sometimes articulation agreements require students to contact the university where they plan to transfer during their first year at community college. Even if the articulation agreement with your transfer institution does not require that you contact them, we strongly encourage you to contact them early in your college career.

Eastern Michigan University

  • Accounting – Eastern Michigan University

    Accounting Associate in Applied Science degree to a Bachelor of Business Administration with any Business major at Eastern Michigan University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy EMU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 45 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU. This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Students with a community college GPA of 2.5 or higher, who have completed the EMU pre-admission business foundation courses (with the exception of IS 215 and DS 265) will receive conditional admission into the College of Business at EMU.

    Articulation Effective Dates: January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2019


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

    Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    EMU College of Business Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    Additional JC Accounting degree Requirements/EMU Electives:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 115 Payroll Accounting 2 CIS 101*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Accurate payroll records and timely payroll tax reporting are critical elements for all successful businesses. Learn to apply payroll accounting rules and procedures to support business operations. Learn employment and tax laws that affect payroll preparation. Learn the skills, procedures, and concepts necessary to compute a company’s payroll. Topics include hiring, gross pay, FICA taxes, income taxes, employee deductions and benefits, payroll accounting, earnings records, tax deposits, unemployment taxes, recording payroll transactions, Form 940EZ, Form 941, reporting employee earnings and special situations.

    ACC 130 QuickBooks Pro 2 ACC 216 or higher and CIS 095*

    Today nearly all businesses rely on computer software to facilitate the accounting process. Learn to use the many features of this popular and sophisticated small business computerized accounting system. Topics include customizing the system to your business, invoicing, statements, collections, bill paying, general ledger, budgeting, and tax reports.

    ACC 214 Income Tax Accounting 3 CIS 095* and MAT 020* or higher

    Federal income tax for personal and business use is explored. Concepts covered include taxable income, deductions, exclusions, exemptions and credits against the tax. Proprietorship tax returns including account and depreciation methods, self-employment taxes, self-employed retirement plans, capital gains and losses, disposition of property (both personal and business) and estimated tax declaration.

    ACC 234 Managerial Accounting 4 ACC 232

    Management level professionals from all disciplines will be faced with complex situations and decisions. Appropriate managerial accounting reports and critical thinking skills are crucial to a proactive management process. Learn about financial statement analysis, cash flow forecasting, job order costing in manufacturing, process costing in manufacturing, activity based costing in manufacturing, cost-volume analysis, cost behavior analysis, budgeting, responsibility accounting, case study analysis, critical thinking and decision-making skills.

    ACC 240 Intermediate Accounting 4 ACC 231

    Professional accountants must have a solid background in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) financial accounting concepts. Review and expand your knowledge of accounting theory and processes, nature and content of the balance sheet and income statement, present value tables and their application, currently applicable General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and recent Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) pronouncements.

    ACC 245 Internship/Externship 3

    Gain valuable work experience in an accounting position. The position must be obtained by the student in coordination with a faculty member and approved by the department before the semester begins.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    CIS 121 Microsoft® Excel® Comprehensive – Windows® 3 ENG 085,* ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Learn Excel® components: charts, creating workbooks, using drawing tools, formatting and auditing worksheets, functions, Internet and intranet documents, modifying and printing workbooks, ranges, database queries, importing and exporting data, macros, working with multiple workbooks, working with existing and creating new templates, and advanced workgroup functions. Keyboarding skills are essential.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php

  • Business Administration – Eastern Michigan University

    Business Administration Associate in Applied Science degree at Jackson College to a Bachelor of Business Administration with any Business major at Eastern Michigan University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy EMU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 45 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Students with a community college GPA of 2.5 or higher, who have completed the EMU pre-admission business foundation courses (with the exception of IS 215 and DS 265) will receive conditional admission into the College of Business at EMU.

    Articulation Effective Dates: January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2019


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    JC/EMU Business Administration Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    Additional Electives

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 115 Payroll Accounting 2 CIS 101*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Accurate payroll records and timely payroll tax reporting are critical elements for all successful businesses. Learn to apply payroll accounting rules and procedures to support business operations. Learn employment and tax laws that affect payroll preparation. Learn the skills, procedures, and concepts necessary to compute a company’s payroll. Topics include hiring, gross pay, FICA taxes, income taxes, employee deductions and benefits, payroll accounting, earnings records, tax deposits, unemployment taxes, recording payroll transactions, Form 940EZ, Form 941, reporting employee earnings and special situations.

    BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

    BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 221 Human Resources Management 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Create and maintain a desirable and productive work place by applying management skills with emphasis on improving performance and career development. Topics include: employment law, recruitment and selection, placement techniques, interview methods, job analysis, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, team building, benefit administration, government regulation, compensation systems, health and safety, and labor-management issues.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ECN 232 is required for EMU’s BBA program. If not transferred from JC, must be completed at EMU.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php

    Sample Course Map

    This program map satisfies the Business Administration Certificate and Business Administration Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree from Jackson College, the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA), and the pre-admission courses for the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University.

    SEMESTER 1

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SEMESTER 2

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 115 Payroll Accounting 2 CIS 101*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Accurate payroll records and timely payroll tax reporting are critical elements for all successful businesses. Learn to apply payroll accounting rules and procedures to support business operations. Learn employment and tax laws that affect payroll preparation. Learn the skills, procedures, and concepts necessary to compute a company’s payroll. Topics include hiring, gross pay, FICA taxes, income taxes, employee deductions and benefits, payroll accounting, earnings records, tax deposits, unemployment taxes, recording payroll transactions, Form 940EZ, Form 941, reporting employee earnings and special situations.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    SEMESTER 3

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    Business Administration Certificate is completed at the end of this term

    SEMESTER 4

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    Business Administration AAS is completed at the end of this term

    SEMESTER 5

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    MTA is completed at the end of this term

  • Cyber Security – Eastern Michigan University

    Cybersecurity Associate in Applied Science degree to a Bachelor of Science in Information Assurance and Cyber Defense at Eastern Michigan University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy EMU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 45 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU. This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Students must apply and be admitted to EMU and to the Information Assurance and Cyber Defense program. A grade of B- or higher in CNS 101 and CNS 201 (IA 110 and IA 103 at EMU) is required for admission to the Information Assurance program at EMU.

    Articulation Effective Dates: September 1, 2018 until August 31, 2021


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

    This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HIS 235 20th Century History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Examination of national and international developments in the past century focusing on such matters as colonialism, global warfare, and emerging nations, appearance and disappearance of communism. In addition, polarization of wealth and power, the revolution in technology, communication, businesses and industry, the conflict between the globalization movement and national tendencies will be examined.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    JC/EMU Cyber Security Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 101 Network Fundamentals/Network+ 4

    This course introduces students to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. It is the first of four courses that help prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification exam. The course materials will assist in developing the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications. It also helps prepare the student for the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

    CNS 106 Routing Protocols & Concepts 4 CNS 101

    This course is the second of four courses that help prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification exam. It covers the routing concepts introduced in CNS 101. The goal is to develop an understanding of how a router learns about remote networks and determines the best path to those networks. This course includes both static routing and dynamic routing protocols.

    CNS 121 Microsoft® Networking Client I 3

    This course will help students gain the knowledge and skills required to configure Windows® Vista® for optimal performance on the desktop. This course focuses on installing the client software, migrating from previous versions of the Microsoft® Windows® client, and configuring systems settings, security features, network connectivity, communications and media applications, and mobile devices.

    CNS 123 Microsoft® Networking Server I 3

    This course covers installing Windows® Server 2008, configuring remote access, Network Access Protection (NAP), network authentication, IPv4 and IPv6 addressing and Domain Name System (DNS) replication: capturing and deploying Microsoft® Window® Deployment Services images; creating virtual machines; and installing server core.

    CNS 124 Microsoft® Networking Server II 3 CNS 123

    This course covers planning Windows® Server 2008 roles; maintain server security; planning data storage, network load balancing, and server backups; managing software deployment and versions; monitoring IPv6, server performance and capacity, and AD replication; scheduling server deployments; and designing a rollback contingency plan.

    CNS 131 Linux Administration I 3

    This course introduces Linux to experienced computer users and to those with a basic knowledge of computers. Students will install and configure a distribution of Linux. They will learn to use a command line shell and a GUI to manage the file system, create user and group accounts, and manage file permissions. This course will cover how to set up a Linux system on a TCP/IP network, bash shell concepts, printing and installing programs Linux.

    CNS 141 Wireless Networking 3 CNS 101

    This course introduces the basic concepts of wireless networking. Students will work with various types of equipment needed to set up and maintain local wireless networks of various sizes. Considerable emphasis will be placed on how to secure access to and the information that travels across wireless networks.

    CNS 201 Network Security/Security+ 3 CNS 106

    The student will be introduced to computer network vulnerabilities and threats and how to safeguard computer networks from those vulnerabilities and threats. This course will expose the student to network security planning, network security technology, network security organization and the legal and ethical issues associated with network security. In this course, students will learn the skills necessary for Security+ certification.

    CNS 210 Python Scripting for Security 3 CNS 101

    This course covers an overview of Python, including how to create and run scripts, use threads, and handle exceptions. It will progress on how to networking, including using Python libraries for networking scripting and developing basic scripts with network functionality. HTTP programming and client, security scripting, Twisted Python, the Echo server, and forensic scripting are also covered. The course emphasizes debugging capability and security testing using Python.

    CNS 233 Hacker Techniques and Incident Handling 3 CNS 131 and CNS 201

    Introduces common computer and network hacking techniques. With a sound understanding of how hackers can compromise computers and computer networks you will learn how to identify when an incident has happened, how to respond in a comprehensive manner, and what steps to take to protect yourself in the future.

    CNS 235 Packet Analysis and Network Forensics 3 CNS 231

    Students utilize common packet sniffing tools, intrusion detection tools and packet analysis tools to determine if malicious activity is occurring on a network. They learn details about how network protocols can be abused by hackers. They find how network connection logging provides a valuable source of evidence.

    CNS 245 Internship/Externship 3 Instructor permission required

    The student will have meaningful work experience related to computer networking and security with an appropriate organization. The organization and position must be approved by supervising faculty member.

    Additional EMU and IACD Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CIS 158 Programming Logic 3 CIS 095*

    Students explore the development of the logic and theory for writing business programs that control the operation of a computer. Course covers the development of both structured design and object-oriented design. Topics include control structures, arrays, data validation, testing and debugging.

    CNS 128 PowerShell Scripting for Network Administrators 3 CNS 121 or CNS 123

    Students will develop the knowledge and skills to utilize Microsoft PowerShell to automate common administrative tasks on a Microsoft® network. This course assumes no prior programming skills.

    CNS 221 Securing Microsoft® Networks 3 CNS 125

    This course will cover how to protect your Windows-based clients, server roles, networks, and Internet services. Students learn how to plan and implement comprehensive security with special emphasis on new Windows® security tools, security objects, security services, user authentication and access control, network security, application security, Windows® Firewall, Active Directory® security, group policy, auditing and patch management.

    CNS 101, CNS 106, CNS 121, CNS 123, CNS 124, CNS 128, CNS 131, CNS 141, CNS 201, CNS, 210, CNS 221 and CIS 158 are required for EMU’s IACD program. If not transferred from JC, must be completed at EMU.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php

    Sample Course Map

    This program map satisfies the Cyber Security Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree from Jackson College, the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA), and the pre-admission courses for the Information Assurance and Cyber Defense program at Eastern Michigan University.

    SEMESTER 1

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 101 Network Fundamentals/Network+ 4

    This course introduces students to fundamental networking concepts and technologies. It is the first of four courses that help prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification exam. The course materials will assist in developing the skills necessary to plan and implement small networks across a range of applications. It also helps prepare the student for the CompTIA Network+ certification exam.

    CNS 121 Microsoft® Networking Client I 3

    This course will help students gain the knowledge and skills required to configure Windows® Vista® for optimal performance on the desktop. This course focuses on installing the client software, migrating from previous versions of the Microsoft® Windows® client, and configuring systems settings, security features, network connectivity, communications and media applications, and mobile devices.

    CNS 131 Linux Administration I 3

    This course introduces Linux to experienced computer users and to those with a basic knowledge of computers. Students will install and configure a distribution of Linux. They will learn to use a command line shell and a GUI to manage the file system, create user and group accounts, and manage file permissions. This course will cover how to set up a Linux system on a TCP/IP network, bash shell concepts, printing and installing programs Linux.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SEMESTER 2

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 106 Routing Protocols & Concepts 4 CNS 101

    This course is the second of four courses that help prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification exam. It covers the routing concepts introduced in CNS 101. The goal is to develop an understanding of how a router learns about remote networks and determines the best path to those networks. This course includes both static routing and dynamic routing protocols.

    CNS 123 Microsoft® Networking Server I 3

    This course covers installing Windows® Server 2008, configuring remote access, Network Access Protection (NAP), network authentication, IPv4 and IPv6 addressing and Domain Name System (DNS) replication: capturing and deploying Microsoft® Window® Deployment Services images; creating virtual machines; and installing server core.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    SEMESTER 3

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 141 Wireless Networking 3 CNS 101

    This course introduces the basic concepts of wireless networking. Students will work with various types of equipment needed to set up and maintain local wireless networks of various sizes. Considerable emphasis will be placed on how to secure access to and the information that travels across wireless networks.

    CNS 201 Network Security/Security+ 3 CNS 106

    The student will be introduced to computer network vulnerabilities and threats and how to safeguard computer networks from those vulnerabilities and threats. This course will expose the student to network security planning, network security technology, network security organization and the legal and ethical issues associated with network security. In this course, students will learn the skills necessary for Security+ certification.

    SEMESTER 4

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

    This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

    CNS 210 Python Scripting for Security 3 CNS 101

    This course covers an overview of Python, including how to create and run scripts, use threads, and handle exceptions. It will progress on how to networking, including using Python libraries for networking scripting and developing basic scripts with network functionality. HTTP programming and client, security scripting, Twisted Python, the Echo server, and forensic scripting are also covered. The course emphasizes debugging capability and security testing using Python.

    CNS 233 Hacker Techniques and Incident Handling 3 CNS 131 and CNS 201

    Introduces common computer and network hacking techniques. With a sound understanding of how hackers can compromise computers and computer networks you will learn how to identify when an incident has happened, how to respond in a comprehensive manner, and what steps to take to protect yourself in the future.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    SEMESTER 5

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 235 Packet Analysis and Network Forensics 3 CNS 231

    Students utilize common packet sniffing tools, intrusion detection tools and packet analysis tools to determine if malicious activity is occurring on a network. They learn details about how network protocols can be abused by hackers. They find how network connection logging provides a valuable source of evidence.

    CNS 245 Internship/Externship 3 Instructor permission required

    The student will have meaningful work experience related to computer networking and security with an appropriate organization. The organization and position must be approved by supervising faculty member.

    HIS 235 20th Century History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Examination of national and international developments in the past century focusing on such matters as colonialism, global warfare, and emerging nations, appearance and disappearance of communism. In addition, polarization of wealth and power, the revolution in technology, communication, businesses and industry, the conflict between the globalization movement and national tendencies will be examined.

    PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

    Cyber Security Associate degree is completed at the end of this term.

    SEMESTER 6

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CNS 221 Securing Microsoft® Networks 3 CNS 125

    This course will cover how to protect your Windows-based clients, server roles, networks, and Internet services. Students learn how to plan and implement comprehensive security with special emphasis on new Windows® security tools, security objects, security services, user authentication and access control, network security, application security, Windows® Firewall, Active Directory® security, group policy, auditing and patch management.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    MTA is completed at the end of this term.

    SEMESTER 7

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CIS 158 Programming Logic 3 CIS 095*

    Students explore the development of the logic and theory for writing business programs that control the operation of a computer. Course covers the development of both structured design and object-oriented design. Topics include control structures, arrays, data validation, testing and debugging.

    CNS 128 PowerShell Scripting for Network Administrators 3 CNS 121 or CNS 123

    Students will develop the knowledge and skills to utilize Microsoft PowerShell to automate common administrative tasks on a Microsoft® network. This course assumes no prior programming skills.

    EMU requirements are finalized at the end of this term.

  • Nursing – Eastern Michigan University

    Nursing Associate in Applied Science degree at Jackson College to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN Completion) at Eastern Michigan University

    Students who complete an Associate in Applied Science – Nursing degree from Jackson College, with at least a C or better in the courses listed below; have passed the NCLEX examination; and who satisfy EMU’s and the School of Nursing’s admissions requirements, will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Required Courses:

    • ANT 131 or SOC 231
    • BIO 220
    • BIO 253 and BIO 254
    • One college-level chemistry course
    • PSY 140
    • PSY 252
    • Proof of passing NCLEX exam

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 30 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU. This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Articulation Effective Dates: September 1, 2017 until August 31, 2020


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

    Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    EMU Nursing Program Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

    This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

    BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 253

    This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

    PSY 252 Developmental Psychology 3 PSY 140

    Principles and theories of human development from conception through adulthood, with applications to foster optimal development. Cognitive, behavioral and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

    Students who pass the NCLEX-RN licensing exam will transfer nursing credit hours as a block (NRS 110, 111, 116, 119, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 230, 240)

    *ANT 131, BIO 220, BIO 253, BIO 254, PSY 140 and PSY 252 are required for EMU’s Nursing program. If not transferred from JC, must be completed at EMU.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php

  • Social Work – Eastern Michigan University

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy EMU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 57 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    BSW Program Admission Process:

    The BSW has several admissions requirements which are designed to help you sort out whether or not the social work profession is the right choice for you:

    1. Overall GPA of 2.3 or higher at the time of admission to the Social Work program.
    2. Submission of an application which will be distributed in SWRK 251 (course completed at EMU).
    3. Completion of 40 hours of post-high school volunteer, employment, or internship experience in a human service setting (Internships at JC can apply to this).
    4. Completion of introductory social work courses: SWRK 120, SWRK 200, SWRK 222, and SWRK 251 with grades of C or higher (courses completed at EMU)**.
    5. Submission of a reflective essay completed in SWRK 251.
    6. Meet with a BSW advisor to develop a plan of study and review progress to date.

    **Students may register in SWRK 120, 200, 222, and 251 at EMU while attending JC in order to complete these courses before starting the professional sequence at EMU.  Students receiving financial aid should contact the EMU Financial Aid Office to ask about options for financial aid.

    Articulation Effective Dates: September 1, 2017 until August 21, 2020


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

    Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

    ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

    BIO 110 Introductory Biology 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    Students will investigate the nature of science and critically analyze scientific data. Basic biological concepts including cancer, biostatistics, organic molecules and nutrition, biotechnology, nutrient cycles, and evolution are presented in the context of current issues. This course includes a discussion component which involves reading, critically evaluating, and discussing scientific papers: thus strong college reading and writing skills are recommended. The course is designed for non-science majors and includes a laboratory component.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

    Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    JC Associate in Arts and EMU Social Work/Liberal Arts Electives

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

    Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

    GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

    PSY 245 Infancy and Childhood 3 PSY 140

    Physical, mental, emotional and social development of the human individual from conception through childhood. Genetic, prenatal and postnatal influences on development are examined. Cognitive and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

    PSY 251 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 140

    Survey of those behaviors that do not fit the norm of society, including causal factors, specific disorders and treatment methods.

    PSY 252 Developmental Psychology 3 PSY 140

    Principles and theories of human development from conception through adulthood, with applications to foster optimal development. Cognitive, behavioral and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

    SOC 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

    (SAME AS PSY 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences/influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction.

    SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

    (SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php

  • Tech Management – Eastern Michigan University

    Articulation Agreement between Jackson College and Eastern Michigan University

    Any Approved Associate in Applied Science degree to a Bachelor of Science in Technology Management

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy EMU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, EMU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 30 credits be completed in courses offered by EMU, of which 15 hours must be in major/program requirements at the 300-level or above.. This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    The Technology Management program at EMU is offered online.

    Articulation Effective Dates: September 1, 2015 until August 31, 2018


    General Education/MTA Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

    Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 135 Finite Mathematics 4 MAT 035 or MAT 131* or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 145) This course is for student whose programs do not require trigonometry(or the calculus sequence). The topics included are linear, exponential, quadratic, polynomial and logarithmic functions and models: systems of linear equations; linear regression; mathematics of finance and financial modeling; matrices, linear programming; permutations; combinations, probability theory; probabilistic simulations; decision theory; descriptive statistics; and Markov chains. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    Technical Concentration

    30-46 credits in technical courses from an approved JC program or discipline may be transferred as a block for the technical concentration.

    Additional EMU requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    Open electives (not to exceed 94 credits at JC)

    The number of elective credits will vary depending on technical concentration. Students must complete a minimum of 124 total credits with at least 30 credits at EMU for a bachelor’s degree.  Students must all meet all degree requirements for their Jackson College program of study.

    Approved Jackson College Programs and Disciplines:

    • 3-D Design and Animation
    • Accounting
    • Alternative Energy
    • Automotive Service Technology
    • Aviation Flight Technology
    • Business Administration
    • Computer Information Systems – all programs
    • Computer Support
    • Corrections and Law Enforcement
    • eCommerce/Web Technology
    • Emergency Medical Services
    • Entrepreneurship
    • Graphic Design
    • Medical Assistant
    • Nursing
    • Radiography
    • Respiratory Care
    • Sonography

    *Other programs may be used with the approval of the EMU program coordinator.

    Note from EMU: Sign up with us!  If you let us know you are using this articulation agreement, we can stay in touch with you and provide information and advising to you while you are still at your community college.  Sign up at:  www.emich.edu/ccr/trackingsystem/Enter.php


Ferris State University


Northwood University

  • Business Administration: Management – Northwood University

    Business Administration Associate in Applied Science degree to a Bachelor of Business Administration with a Management major at Northwood University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy Northwood’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, Northwood will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 32 credits be completed in courses offered by Northwood.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Articulation Effective Dates: January 2017 to Present


    General Education/MTA Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    HIS 131 Western Civilization to 1555 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course examines the roots of Western culture and its development through the Reformation. The course also surveys the social, philosophical, scientific, artistic, religious and political setting evolution with emphasis on the role of ideas and their consequences in the history of the human kind from the beginning to the 16th century.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 135 Finite Mathematics 4 MAT 035 or MAT 131* or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 145) This course is for student whose programs do not require trigonometry(or the calculus sequence). The topics included are linear, exponential, quadratic, polynomial and logarithmic functions and models: systems of linear equations; linear regression; mathematics of finance and financial modeling; matrices, linear programming; permutations; combinations, probability theory; probabilistic simulations; decision theory; descriptive statistics; and Markov chains. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

    In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

    PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Plus:

    • Natural Science elective for MTA
    • Humanities elective for MTA

    JC/Northwood Business Core Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

    BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

    BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 221 Human Resources Management 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Create and maintain a desirable and productive work place by applying management skills with emphasis on improving performance and career development. Topics include: employment law, recruitment and selection, placement techniques, interview methods, job analysis, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, team building, benefit administration, government regulation, compensation systems, health and safety, and labor-management issues.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

  • Business Administration: Marketing – Northwood University

    Business Administration Associate in Applied Science degree to a Bachelor of Business Administration with a Marketing major at Northwood University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy Northwood’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, Northwood will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 32 credits be completed in courses offered by Northwood.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Articulation Effective Dates: January 2017 to Present


    General Education/MTA Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    HIS 131 Western Civilization to 1555 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course examines the roots of Western culture and its development through the Reformation. The course also surveys the social, philosophical, scientific, artistic, religious and political setting evolution with emphasis on the role of ideas and their consequences in the history of the human kind from the beginning to the 16th century.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 135 Finite Mathematics 4 MAT 035 or MAT 131* or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 145) This course is for student whose programs do not require trigonometry(or the calculus sequence). The topics included are linear, exponential, quadratic, polynomial and logarithmic functions and models: systems of linear equations; linear regression; mathematics of finance and financial modeling; matrices, linear programming; permutations; combinations, probability theory; probabilistic simulations; decision theory; descriptive statistics; and Markov chains. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

    In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

    PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Plus:

    • Natural Science elective for MTA
    • Humanities elective for MTA

    JC/Northwood Business Core Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 131 Effective Selling 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This class covers the basic fundamentals of selling, adaptable to any product or potential customer. Skills learned include satisfying customer needs, recognizing individual motives for purchase, sales psychology, business etiquette and developing a long-term consultative relationship with customers. Persuasive sales presentations are developed and delivered using the steps of the selling process.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 221 Human Resources Management 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Create and maintain a desirable and productive work place by applying management skills with emphasis on improving performance and career development. Topics include: employment law, recruitment and selection, placement techniques, interview methods, job analysis, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, team building, benefit administration, government regulation, compensation systems, health and safety, and labor-management issues.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 231 Advertising, Promotion & Public Relations 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Students study the principles and practices of numerous promotional tools used in marketing communications. Topics include creation of advertising, media strategies, message appeals, plus the use of specialty advertising, sales promotion and public relations to help sell goods, services and ideas.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ECM 101 eCommerce Fundamentals 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    The course introduces revenue models for conducting business transactions globally with customers over the Internet. Topics include integrating eBusiness strategies with traditional store-front objectives, procuring hardware and software resources, optimizing web marketing opportunities, and complying with legal, ethical and regulatory restrictions. Student will apply concepts to real-life scenarios through active-learning strategies.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.


Siena Heights University

  • Accounting – Siena Heights University

    3+1 Degree Completion Agreements between Jackson College and Siena Heights University

    Accounting Associate in Applied Science degree at Jackson College to Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Accounting at Siena Heights University 

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the transfer guidesheets with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy the Siena Heights admissions requirements will be accepted into the transfer agreements. These are 3+1 agreements, with SHU courses being offered on-site at Jackson College

    Students considering this option should make an intake appointment with a SHU program advisor.  The SHU office is located in James McDivitt Hall, 517.796.8672.

    • 87 credits transferred
    • Jackson College program: Accounting Associate in Applied Science

    General Education

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

    Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Accounting Related Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    Accounting Core Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 115 Payroll Accounting 2 CIS 101*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Accurate payroll records and timely payroll tax reporting are critical elements for all successful businesses. Learn to apply payroll accounting rules and procedures to support business operations. Learn employment and tax laws that affect payroll preparation. Learn the skills, procedures, and concepts necessary to compute a company’s payroll. Topics include hiring, gross pay, FICA taxes, income taxes, employee deductions and benefits, payroll accounting, earnings records, tax deposits, unemployment taxes, recording payroll transactions, Form 940EZ, Form 941, reporting employee earnings and special situations.

    ACC 130 QuickBooks Pro 2 ACC 216 or higher and CIS 095*

    Today nearly all businesses rely on computer software to facilitate the accounting process. Learn to use the many features of this popular and sophisticated small business computerized accounting system. Topics include customizing the system to your business, invoicing, statements, collections, bill paying, general ledger, budgeting, and tax reports.

    ACC 214 Income Tax Accounting 3 CIS 095* and MAT 020* or higher

    Federal income tax for personal and business use is explored. Concepts covered include taxable income, deductions, exclusions, exemptions and credits against the tax. Proprietorship tax returns including account and depreciation methods, self-employment taxes, self-employed retirement plans, capital gains and losses, disposition of property (both personal and business) and estimated tax declaration.

    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ACC 234 Managerial Accounting 4 ACC 232

    Management level professionals from all disciplines will be faced with complex situations and decisions. Appropriate managerial accounting reports and critical thinking skills are crucial to a proactive management process. Learn about financial statement analysis, cash flow forecasting, job order costing in manufacturing, process costing in manufacturing, activity based costing in manufacturing, cost-volume analysis, cost behavior analysis, budgeting, responsibility accounting, case study analysis, critical thinking and decision-making skills.

    ACC 240 Intermediate Accounting 4 ACC 231

    Professional accountants must have a solid background in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) financial accounting concepts. Review and expand your knowledge of accounting theory and processes, nature and content of the balance sheet and income statement, present value tables and their application, currently applicable General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and recent Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) pronouncements.

    ACC 245 Internship/Externship 3

    Gain valuable work experience in an accounting position. The position must be obtained by the student in coordination with a faculty member and approved by the department before the semester begins.

    Accounting Electives:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    SHU Additional Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    Additional Requirements to Complete MTA

    It is highly encouraged for students to complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) as this will satisfy lower-level General Education requirements.

    • Natural Science Elective from MTA approved list (4 credits)
    • Humanities Elective from MTA approved list (3 credits)
    • Social Science Elective from MTA approved list (3 credits)

    TOTAL: 87 Jackson College credits

    3+1 Agreement Electives

    Students can choose up to 10 credit hours of additional 100-level transferable coursework. SHU will accept a maximum of four credit hours from physical education courses.

  • Business Administration – Siena Heights University

    3+1 Degree Completion Agreements between Jackson College and Siena Heights University

    Business Administration Associate in Applied Science degree at Jackson College to Bachelor of Business Administration at Siena Heights Univsity 

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the transfer guidesheets with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy the Siena Heights admissions requirements will be accepted into the transfer agreements. These are 3+1 agreements, with SHU courses being offered on-site at Jackson College

    Students considering this option should make an intake appointment with a SHU program advisor.  The SHU office is located in James McDivitt Hall, 517.796.8672.

    • 87 credits transferred
    • Jackson College program: Business Administration Associate in Applied Science

    General Education

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

    Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

    COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Business Administration Related Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    Business Administration Core Requirements:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 245 Internship/Externship 3

    Students will have meaningful work experience with an appropriate company. The company and job must be approved by the supervising faculty member.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    Business Administration Electives:

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

    BUA 122 Successful Small Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Do you have what it takes to own your own business? Discover that, as well as sources of financing, forms of legal ownership, niche marketing, and most importantly, how to avoid business failure.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    SHU Additional Requirements

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    Additional Requirements to Complete MTA

    It is highly encouraged for students to complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) as this will satisfy lower-level General Education requirements.

    • Natural Science Elective from MTA approved list (4 credits)
    • Humanities Elective from MTA approved list (3 credits)
    • Social Science Elective from MTA approved list (3 credits)

    TOTAL: 87 Jackson College credits

    3+1 Agreement Electives

    Students can choose up to 10 credit hours of additional 100-level transferable coursework. SHU will accept a maximum of four credit hours from physical education courses.

    TOTAL: 87 Jackson College credits


Spring Arbor University


Wayne State University

  • Business Administration – Wayne State University

    Business Administration Associate in Applied Science degree at Jackson College to a Bachelor of Business Administration with any Business major at Wayne State University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy WSU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Under this agreement, WSU will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 40 credits be completed in courses offered by WSU.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at JC, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree.

    Students with a community college GPA of 2.5 or higher and at least 24 transferable credits completed can be accepted as transfer students to Wayne State. Please be sure to officially declare a business major after being admitted to the university.

    Mike Ilitch School of Business major declaration form

    Articulation Effective Dates: September 1, 2017 through September 1, 2022


    General Education (26 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Business Administration Related Requirements (10 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    Business Administration Core Requirements (12 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    Business Administration Electives (16 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

    BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

    BUA 122 Successful Small Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Do you have what it takes to own your own business? Discover that, as well as sources of financing, forms of legal ownership, niche marketing, and most importantly, how to avoid business failure.

    BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    WSU Additional Major Requirements (10 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    Additional Requirements to Complete MTA (7 credits)*

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    Subtotal: 81 credits

    * MTA Satisfied: It is highly encouraged for students to complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) as this will satisfy WSU General Education requirements.

    Sample Course Map

    This program map satisfies the Business Administration Certificate and Business Administration Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree from Jackson College, the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA), and the pre-admission courses for the Mike Ilitch School of Business at Wayne State University.

    SEMESTER 1

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 100 Contemporary Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    (FORMERLY BUS 131) As business speeds into the 21st century, new techniques, population shifts, and shrinking global barriers are altering the world at a frantic pace. Learn about the range of business careers available and the daily decisions, tasks and challenges that they face. Emphasis is placed upon developing a vocabulary of business terminology, teamwork, quality, social responsibility and cultural diversity. Understand how management, marketing, accounting, and human resource management work together to provide ethical competitive advantages for firms. This knowledge can help you enhance your career potential.

    BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

    CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    Enhance computer knowledge. Course covers computer system concepts with an emphasis on several software applications. Typing ability necessary to be successful in this class.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SEMESTER 2

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 122 Successful Small Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Do you have what it takes to own your own business? Discover that, as well as sources of financing, forms of legal ownership, niche marketing, and most importantly, how to avoid business failure.

    BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

    ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

    A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

    MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

    (FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

    SEMESTER 3

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

    This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    BUA 130 Customer Service 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    In the face of change, an uncertain economy, and intensive competition, the student will learn how to create an unexpected, highly evolving experience, to create customer loyalty and compelling word of mouth customers. The core element of service quality will be applied to both people-centered and technology-centered businesses, industries and organizations. The ultimate goal of this course is to help improve students’ abilities to communicate effectively with internal and external customers.

    BUA 230 Principles of Marketing 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

    Students analyze the marketplace to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on research, marketing environments, strategic planning, buyer behavior, evaluating key competitors, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and distribution.

    BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    Business Administration Certificate is completed at the end of this term

    SEMESTER 4

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

    NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

    An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    Business Administration AAS is completed at the end of this term

    SEMESTER 5

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ACC 232 Principles of Accounting II 4 ACC 231

    This course is an introductory course in Managerial Accounting. Learn how accounting impacts managerial decision making. Topics include stocks, bonds, cash flow, cost accounting, break-even analysis, differential analysis, financial statements and budgeting. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

    ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

    This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    MTA is completed at the end of this term

  • Engineering – Wayne State University

    Associate in Science degree/Fundamentals of Engineering Certificate at Jackson College to a Bachelor of Science in Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology at Wayne State University.

    Articulation Agreements are formal agreements between two or more Colleges and Universities documenting the transfer policies for a specific academic program or degree. Under this agreement, Wayne State University will waive the 60-hour rule and require that a minimum of 45 credits be completed in courses offered by WSU.  This allows students to complete more than 60 credit hours at Jackson College, and have those hours applied toward their bachelor’s degree. This agreement satisfies the Associate in Science degree from Jackson College, the Fundamentals of Engineering certificate from Jackson College, the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA), and the pre-requisite courses for the College of Engineering at Wayne State University.

    JC students who complete an associate degree, complete the courses outlined in the guidesheet with a grade of “C” or better, and satisfy WSU’s admissions requirements will be accepted into the articulation agreement.

    Students with a community college GPA of 2.5 or higher and at least 24 transferable credits completed can be accepted as transfer students to Wayne State.

    Articulation Effective Dates: January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2022


    General Education (30 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

    Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

    CEM 141 General Chemistry I 5 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 131* or higher

    This course is required for most sciences, engineering, and pre-professional health majors. Students who are required to take organic chemistry for their major should enroll in CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry. Course includes a laboratory component.

    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    MAT 151 Calculus I 4 MAT 141*

    (FORMERLY MTH 151) First calculus course for business, mathematics, engineering and science students explores introductory plane analytic geometry, the derivative, the integral and their applications for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    Fundamentals of Engineering Requirements (26 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CPS 177 Programming in C++ 3

    (SAME AS CIS 170) Students study digital computing systems and how they are used to solve problems. Students use procedural and object-oriented programming capabilities to design, develop and test computer programs. Topics covered include program development, functions, control structures, text file operations, classes, recursion, arrays and pointers.

    MAT 154 Calculus II 5 MAT 151*

    (FORMERLY MTH 154) This course explores the following topics: methods and applications of the derivative and integral for inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, indeterminate forms, series and polar/parametric representation of functions. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, the recommendation is the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 251 Calculus III 4 MAT 154

    (FORMERLY MTH 251) Solid analytical geometry is integrated throughout this course covering the calculus of vector valued functions, multivariable functions, and vector fields with applications. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MAT 254 Differential Equations 4 MAT 154

    (FORMERLY MTH 254) Explore solutions of first order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms, eigenvectors and eigenvalues and application to solution of systems of linear first order equations. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    PHY 251 Modern University Physics I 5 MAT 151 or higher

    Students cover classical mechanics, thermodynamics and wave motion. This course should be elected by all science and engineering students. Course includes a laboratory component.

    PHY 252 Modern University Physics II 5 PHY 251

    Students cover topics in classical electricity and magnetism, optics, special relativity and modern physics. A continuation of PHY 251. Course includes a laboratory component.

    Additional WSU EET Requirements  (4 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ELT 140 Introduction to Digital Electronics 4 ENG 085 and MAT 020* or higher

    This course is the beginning course in digital electronics. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, and basic logic gates and circuits.

    Additional Requirements to Complete Michigan Transfer Agreement (6 credits)*

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

    This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    Transferable Electives (20 credits)

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CAD 151 AutoCAD 1 3 MFG 105 and ENG 085*

    This course covers the applications in which the phases of computer graphics are involved. A general introduction to drafting application will be presented. Recommended: Windows® and blue print reading experience.

    ELT 150 Residential Wiring 2

    Topics covered in this course include blueprint reading, NEC code, branch circuit design, service entrance and switch control. Students are required to practice wiring and design skills with hands-on experiences.

    GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

    HIS 231 Development of the U.S. through the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course is the study of American national history beginning with the colonization to the Civil War. Themes include exploration and settlement, development of political theory, development of the West and its influence on the country, the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.

    PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

    In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

    PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    Subtotal: 86 credits

    * MTA Satisfied: It is highly encouraged for students to complete the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) as this will satisfy WSU General Education requirements.

    Sample Course Map

    This program map satisfies the Associate in Science degree from Jackson College, the Fundamentals of Engineering certificate from Jackson College, the Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA), and the pre-requisite courses for the College of Engineering at Wayne State University.

    The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

    SEMESTER 1 – FALL

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CEM 141 General Chemistry I 5 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 131* or higher

    This course is required for most sciences, engineering, and pre-professional health majors. Students who are required to take organic chemistry for their major should enroll in CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry. Course includes a laboratory component.

    ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

    This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    MAT 151 Calculus I 4 MAT 141*

    (FORMERLY MTH 151) First calculus course for business, mathematics, engineering and science students explores introductory plane analytic geometry, the derivative, the integral and their applications for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

    Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

    SEMESTER 2 – WINTER

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    (FORMERLY SPH 231)

    CPS 177 Programming in C++ 3

    (SAME AS CIS 170) Students study digital computing systems and how they are used to solve problems. Students use procedural and object-oriented programming capabilities to design, develop and test computer programs. Topics covered include program development, functions, control structures, text file operations, classes, recursion, arrays and pointers.

    ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

    This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

    MAT 154 Calculus II 5 MAT 151*

    (FORMERLY MTH 154) This course explores the following topics: methods and applications of the derivative and integral for inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, indeterminate forms, series and polar/parametric representation of functions. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, the recommendation is the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    SEMESTER 3 – FALL

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

    This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

    MAT 251 Calculus III 4 MAT 154

    (FORMERLY MTH 251) Solid analytical geometry is integrated throughout this course covering the calculus of vector valued functions, multivariable functions, and vector fields with applications. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

    Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

    PHY 251 Modern University Physics I 5 MAT 151 or higher

    Students cover classical mechanics, thermodynamics and wave motion. This course should be elected by all science and engineering students. Course includes a laboratory component.

    SEMESTER 4 – WINTER

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

    Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

    ELT 140 Introduction to Digital Electronics 4 ENG 085 and MAT 020* or higher

    This course is the beginning course in digital electronics. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, and basic logic gates and circuits.

    MAT 254 Differential Equations 4 MAT 154

    (FORMERLY MTH 254) Explore solutions of first order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, variation of parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms, eigenvectors and eigenvalues and application to solution of systems of linear first order equations. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

    PHY 252 Modern University Physics II 5 PHY 251

    Students cover topics in classical electricity and magnetism, optics, special relativity and modern physics. A continuation of PHY 251. Course includes a laboratory component.

    Associate in Science degree and Fundamentals of Engineering certificate completed at the end of this semester

    SEMESTER 5 – FALL

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    CAD 151 AutoCAD 1 3 MFG 105 and ENG 085*

    This course covers the applications in which the phases of computer graphics are involved. A general introduction to drafting application will be presented. Recommended: Windows® and blue print reading experience.

    ELT 150 Residential Wiring 2

    Topics covered in this course include blueprint reading, NEC code, branch circuit design, service entrance and switch control. Students are required to practice wiring and design skills with hands-on experiences.

    GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

    SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

    HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

    Michigan Transfer Agreement is completed at the end of this term

    SEMESTER 6 – WINTER

    Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
    ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

    This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

    HIS 231 Development of the U.S. through the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

    This course is the study of American national history beginning with the colonization to the Civil War. Themes include exploration and settlement, development of political theory, development of the West and its influence on the country, the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.

    PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

    In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

    PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

    Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.