Behavioral Sciences – Certificate

This certificate is designed for students who plan to transfer to four-year institutions as psychology majors. Certificate graduates could also find entry-level employment as clinic technicians in human services fields. This coursework also fulfills many general education requirements for the Associate in Arts degree. Students should verify requirements with their transfer institutions.

*To be eligible for Title IV Federal funding, students enrolled in the Behavioral Sciences Certificate should also enroll in the Associate in Arts degree. The Behavioral Sciences Certificate as a stand alone program is not eligible for Title IV Federal funding (financial aid).


Minimum credits: 25
Minimum cumulative GPA: 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses: 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits: 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

Choose one focus, based on transfer or program goals:

PSYCHOLOGY FOCUS

Choose six of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

PSY 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

(SAME AS SOC 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences, influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction will be studied.

PSY 222 Applied Behavior Analysis 3 PSY 140

Methods and techniques for changing behaviors based on learning principles. Includes modeling, simulation, role playing, operant, aversion, fear reduction and self-management methods.

PSY 245 Infancy and Childhood 3 PSY 140

Physical, mental, emotional and social development of the human individual from conception through childhood. Genetic, prenatal and postnatal influences on development are examined. Cognitive and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

PSY 251 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 140

Survey of those behaviors that do not fit the norm of society, including causal factors, specific disorders and treatment methods.

PSY 252 Developmental Psychology 3 PSY 140

Principles and theories of human development from conception through adulthood, with applications to foster optimal development. Cognitive, behavioral and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

PSY 290 Human Sexuality 3 PSY 140

Physiological, psychological and sociocultural influences on human sexuality, including gender, sexual maturation and behavior, identity, values, orientation, relationships, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual disorders and therapy.

PSY 344 Organizational Psychology 3 ENG 131 and PSY 140

Performance management and organizational change techniques based on principles of behavioral psychology. Environmental change strategies are emphasized. Topics include personnel management, employee motivation, job satisfaction, compensation strategies and practices, employee behavior and leadership.

SOCIAL WORK FOCUS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 231 General Botany 4 BIO 110, BIO 161 or BIO 162

(FORMERLY BIO 151) Emphasizes the development, anatomy, physiology and evolution of angiosperms. A survey of the plant kingdom with representative life cycles stresses relationships among plant groups. Course includes a laboratory component.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

SOC 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

(SAME AS PSY 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences/influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

SOC 246 Marriage and Family 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The position and significance of marriage and the family in contemporary society are examined. Issues are examined within the larger political, historical and social context, including marriage and family values within diverse ethnic, minority and gender identity groups. SOC 231 recommended before enrolling in this course.

SWK 292 Introduction to Social Work 3

An introduction to the social work profession, code of ethics, values, and social welfare policy. This is an examination of the profession’s responsibilities in correlation to the populations served. This includes a history of social work as well as the role of the social work profession and different settings of practice.

Prerequisite: PSY 140 or SOC 231

POLITICAL SCIENCE FOCUS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

HIS 235 20th Century History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examination of national and international developments in the past century focusing on such matters as colonialism, global warfare, and emerging nations, appearance and disappearance of communism. In addition, polarization of wealth and power, the revolution in technology, communication, businesses and industry, the conflict between the globalization movement and national tendencies will be examined.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

Choose two of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

HIS 231 Development of the U.S. through the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course is the study of American national history beginning with the colonization to the Civil War. Themes include exploration and settlement, development of political theory, development of the West and its influence on the country, the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.

HIS 232 Development of the U.S. from the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course examines the period from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present day. It emphasizes: industrial, commercial and agricultural expansion; intellectual currents; outstanding social changes; the nation’s expanding role in the world affairs, and the Cold War.

LAW ENFORCEMENT FOCUS
Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CRJ 101 Criminal Law 3 ENG 085*

This course covers both substantive and procedural law at local, state and federal levels. Special emphasis given to the Michigan Penal Code and landmark court decisions.

CRJ 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers the history, evolution and philosophy of the American criminal justice system. Emphasis on the interrelationship of system components: police, attorneys, courts and corrections.

CRJ 112 Crime & Delinquency 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Introduction to deviant behavior and current criminological theories with emphasis on synthesis and police applications to juveniles; diversion and status offenses considered.

CRJ 114 Police Administration & Operations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Administration and operation of a police department including line/staff activities are explored.

CRJ 117 Criminology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(SAME AS SOC 117) Provides an understanding of the cultural nature, origin and development of criminal behavior with attention given to the psychological and sociological factors involved.

CRJ 121 Introduction to Corrections 3 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, and MAT 020*

A survey of the American corrections system as a component of the criminal justice system.

EDUCATION FOCUS
Designed for those seeking elementary teacher education

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EDU 221 Exploring Teaching 3 ENG 131

“What are the things prospective teachers beginning their formal study of teacher education should know?” Students will gain knowledge of the role of a professional teacher and education topics: schools, diverse students and their needs, historical and current education issues and trends, as well as philosophical and legal foundations in American education. Students will explore and experience key concepts and skills through reading, research, presentation of a lesson, development of a professional portfolio and a teaching philosophy, documented technology and education site-based field experiences. Minimum of 16 hours field experience is included.

EDU 232 The Exceptional Child 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

This survey course introduces the learner to exceptional children from pre-kindergarten through adolescence. Characteristics, educational considerations and implications for educators and parents are a sample of the topics addressed. Developmental factors and the role of families in education and intervention, appropriate practices, culturally competent professional behavior, and collaborative interpersonal and inter-professional actions are included. The course includes historical and organizational factors, laws, and implications of all areas of exceptionality that govern special education. A minimum of five hours of approved literacy field service is required.

EDU 263 Child Growth & Development 3 ENG 131

This course surveys learning development from prenatal stages through adolescence. Students study normal and exceptional development of the physical, cognitive, emotional and social domains of children in the contexts of home, school and group settings. Students study developmental theories and best practice methods. A minimum of 20 hours of approved field service including a group diversity project is required.

MAT 210 Foundations of Mathematics I 4 MAT 131*

(FORMERLY MTH 210) This course provides background material for students preparing to teach at the elementary level and emphasizes the structure and properties of the number system. It also covers concepts, models in algorithms for whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals and percents. Some additional hours of on-site field work may be required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 211 Foundations of Mathematics II 4 MAT 210

(FORMERLY MTH 211) This course will provide the second semester of math content for elementary education majors. It is a continuation course for MAT 210; Foundations of Mathematics I. Topics include probability and statistics, geometry and measurement. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

PSY 256 Educational Psychology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Application of psychological theories to the teaching-learning process. Principles of cognitive and social development discussed along with discipline, motivation and assessment and evaluation.