Electrician – Associate in Applied Science

Electricians install and maintain electrical systems in residential construction and commercial buildings. They also work in manufacturing settings often servicing highly automated industrial processes. Increasingly electricians will be required to wire computer networks and telecommunications. This program will prepare students to work in each of these applications of electricity.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 63
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (23-25 credits)

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly (3 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly (3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning (4 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning (4-5 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 110 Introductory Biology 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Students will investigate the nature of science and critically analyze scientific data. Basic biological concepts including cancer, biostatistics, organic molecules and nutrition, biotechnology, nutrient cycles, and evolution are presented in the context of current issues. This course includes a discussion component which involves reading, critically evaluating, and discussing scientific papers: thus strong college reading and writing skills are recommended. The course is designed for non-science majors and includes a laboratory component.

BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

BIO 158 Environmental Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for environmental science majors. It is also suitable for non-majors interested in environmental topics. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Environmental case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to analyze quantitative environmental data through application. This class has a laboratory component.

BIO 161 General Biology I 4 ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Biology 161 is the first semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers nature of science, a survey of the major groups of living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants and animals), the process and evidence for evolution, and the fundamentals of ecology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 162 General Biology II 4 CEM 131 or higher

Biology 162 is the second semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers the chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, molecular and Mendelian genetics, cell division, gene regulation and biotechnology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component. Successful completion of BIO 161 is recommended prior to enrollment .

BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

CEM 141 General Chemistry I 5 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 131* or higher

This course is required for most sciences, engineering, and pre-professional health majors. Students who are required to take organic chemistry for their major should enroll in CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

GEL 160 Introduction to Geology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The course covers minerals, rocks, earthquakes and volcanoes. It also covers the landscapes and behaviors of continents and oceans. Diagrams, photographs, topographic maps, Internet resources and hands-on exercises are utilized to support the concepts. Course includes a laboratory component.

NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 131 Conceptual Physics 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Become familiar with basic concepts used in physics to describe and explain various physical phenomena. The course covers the following topics: kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics (the study of force, momentum and energy); the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the basics of physics using a minimum of mathematics. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 151 Astronomy 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

A one-semester conceptual astronomy course for non-science majors. This is a survey course that focuses on four broad content categories: motions of the sky, the solar system, light and stars, and the universe. The emphasis of the course is on critical thinking about specific topics in these categories. The course has an associated laboratory in which students run experiments to verify the concepts presented. The mathematical skills necessary for this course include working with ratios, rates, scaling, unit conversion, percentages, exponents, graphing, basic geometry and substitution into formulas.

PHY 231 College Physics I 4 MAT 131 or higher

Pre-professional and engineering technology students explore kinematics, mechanics, dynamics, thermodynamics, acoustics and general wave motion. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 251 Modern University Physics I 5 MAT 151 or higher

Students cover classical mechanics, thermodynamics and wave motion. This course should be elected by all science and engineering students. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them (3-4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

HIS 131 Western Civilization to 1555 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course examines the roots of Western culture and its development through the Reformation. The course also surveys the social, philosophical, scientific, artistic, religious and political setting evolution with emphasis on the role of ideas and their consequences in the history of the human kind from the beginning to the 16th century.

HIS 132 Western Civilization 1555 to Present 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course is a continuation of HIS 131, emphasizing the development of new political areas, economic and social theories, the evolution and expansion of modern states, and efforts to control international tensions from the 16th century to the present.

HIS 231 Development of the U.S. through the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course is the study of American national history beginning with the colonization to the Civil War. Themes include exploration and settlement, development of political theory, development of the West and its influence on the country, the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.

HIS 232 Development of the U.S. from the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course examines the period from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present day. It emphasizes: industrial, commercial and agricultural expansion; intellectual currents; outstanding social changes; the nation’s expanding role in the world affairs, and the Cold War.

HIS 235 20th Century History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examination of national and international developments in the past century focusing on such matters as colonialism, global warfare, and emerging nations, appearance and disappearance of communism. In addition, polarization of wealth and power, the revolution in technology, communication, businesses and industry, the conflict between the globalization movement and national tendencies will be examined.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity (3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures (3-4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

ENG 236 Women In a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS SOC 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

ENG 242 Sports in Film and Literature 3 ENG 131

This course is an inquiry into historical and changing role of sports in American culture through novels, essays, biographies, films, documentaries and sports-related poetry.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 257 World Literature I 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students compare major themes and writers from Africa, America, Asia and Europe.

FRN 131 Elementary French I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

GER 131 Elementary German I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

HIS 125 African-American History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examines the role African-Americans have historically played in the political, economic and social construction of America.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 130 Music of Non-Western Cultures 3 ENG 085*

Discovering the music of non-Western cultures through lecture and directed listening.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

SOC 246 Marriage and Family 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The position and significance of marriage and the family in contemporary society are examined. Issues are examined within the larger political, historical and social context, including marriage and family values within diverse ethnic, minority and gender identity groups. SOC 231 recommended before enrolling in this course.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

CORE REQUIREMENTS (40 credits)

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ELT 120 Circuit Analysis I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Students examine the fundamental concepts of DC circuits including electricity and magnetism, resistance, capacitance, inductance, series and parallel circuits, power and basic electrical measurements.

ELT 126 Circuit Analysis II 4 ELT 120

A study of alternating electrical current is presented. Topics include AC measurements, resistance, inductance and capacitance in AC circuits.

ELT 130 Electronics I 4 ELT 126

Study of electronic devices including diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, integrated circuits, and other semiconductor devices; their parameters, nomenclature, characteristics, and application to practical circuitry.

ELT 140 Introduction to Digital Electronics 4 ENG 085 and MAT 020* or higher

This course is the beginning course in digital electronics. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, and basic logic gates and circuits.

ELT 150 Residential Wiring 2

Topics covered in this course include blueprint reading, NEC code, branch circuit design, service entrance and switch control. Students are required to practice wiring and design skills with hands-on experiences.

ELT 151 Commercial Wiring 2 ELT 105 or 150

Topics covered in this course include wiring plans of commercial buildings, three phase 208/120 volt services, lighting fixtures, service entrances and metering facilities. The students will be given opportunities to practice skills in the wiring laboratory.

ELT 152 Industrial Wiring 2 ELT 150

Topics covered in this course include, substation and high voltage metering, feed duct, panel boards, motors and controllers, signal systems, ventilation and others. Students will be given opportunities to practice skills in the electrical wiring laboratory.

ELT 215 Electrical Troubleshooting 2 ELT 126 and ELT 152

This course explores troubleshooting in various areas such as: control circuits, combination starters, control devices, special controls, DC motors, AC motors, lighting systems with use of schematics, building drawings, and with emphasis on cutting trouble-shooting time.

ELT 220 Industrial Motion Control 3 ELT 105 or ELT 126

This course covers motion controls as used in real world situations, including PLC, robotics, servos, sensing devices, actuators and controls.

ELT 250 Electric Motors & Controls 4 ELT 126

Basic principles involved in the operation of motors and controls. Study includes single-phase motors and their operating principles, polyphase systems and the various control devices used with these systems.

ELT 260 Basic Programmable Controllers 4 ELT 126

Basic programmable controllers is a course for apprentices and skilled trades trainees looking at the history, characteristics, application and limitation of PCs. Numeration systems, binary-coded decimals, ASCII, gray code and Boolean logic studied. Additional study includes input/output devices, processing and programming functions, program development, documentation, start-up and troubleshooting.

ELT 261 Advanced PLC Programming 2 ELT 260

This course introduces topics that include advanced PLC programming, troubleshooting and data communications.

ELT 274 Electrician’s National Code 3 ELT 150

This course is an extensive study of the national and local electric codes for wiring and apparatuses. It covers wiring design and protection, wiring methods and materials, equipment for general use including motors and controllers, special occupancies such as hazardous location; special equipment such as electric welding and machine tool wiring, and the use of tables and diagrams for the solution of practical wiring problems.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
EMS 110 Advanced First Aid & American Heart CPR 2

This course provides instruction in adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation, as well as advanced first aid. It is designed to prepare an individual to handle medical or accidental emergencies until professional help arrives or until the victim can seek help, and to handle minor injuries that do not require professional assistance. Upon successful completion of this course, the student is qualified to receive CPR and Advanced First Aid certificates through the American Heart Association (AHA) and American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS).

OR Current Adult CPR and First Aid Certification

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ELT 120 Circuit Analysis I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

Students examine the fundamental concepts of DC circuits including electricity and magnetism, resistance, capacitance, inductance, series and parallel circuits, power and basic electrical measurements.

ELT 150 Residential Wiring 2

Topics covered in this course include blueprint reading, NEC code, branch circuit design, service entrance and switch control. Students are required to practice wiring and design skills with hands-on experiences.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

ELT 126 Circuit Analysis II 4 ELT 120

A study of alternating electrical current is presented. Topics include AC measurements, resistance, inductance and capacitance in AC circuits.

ELT 130 Electronics I 4 ELT 126

Study of electronic devices including diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, integrated circuits, and other semiconductor devices; their parameters, nomenclature, characteristics, and application to practical circuitry.

ELT 151 Commercial Wiring 2 ELT 105 or 150

Topics covered in this course include wiring plans of commercial buildings, three phase 208/120 volt services, lighting fixtures, service entrances and metering facilities. The students will be given opportunities to practice skills in the wiring laboratory.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ELT 140 Introduction to Digital Electronics 4 ENG 085 and MAT 020* or higher

This course is the beginning course in digital electronics. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, and basic logic gates and circuits.

ELT 152 Industrial Wiring 2 ELT 150

Topics covered in this course include, substation and high voltage metering, feed duct, panel boards, motors and controllers, signal systems, ventilation and others. Students will be given opportunities to practice skills in the electrical wiring laboratory.

ELT 250 Electric Motors & Controls 4 ELT 126

Basic principles involved in the operation of motors and controls. Study includes single-phase motors and their operating principles, polyphase systems and the various control devices used with these systems.

ELT 260 Basic Programmable Controllers 4 ELT 126

Basic programmable controllers is a course for apprentices and skilled trades trainees looking at the history, characteristics, application and limitation of PCs. Numeration systems, binary-coded decimals, ASCII, gray code and Boolean logic studied. Additional study includes input/output devices, processing and programming functions, program development, documentation, start-up and troubleshooting.

EMS 110 Advanced First Aid & American Heart CPR 2

This course provides instruction in adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation, as well as advanced first aid. It is designed to prepare an individual to handle medical or accidental emergencies until professional help arrives or until the victim can seek help, and to handle minor injuries that do not require professional assistance. Upon successful completion of this course, the student is qualified to receive CPR and Advanced First Aid certificates through the American Heart Association (AHA) and American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS).

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

ELT 215 Electrical Troubleshooting 2 ELT 126 and ELT 152

This course explores troubleshooting in various areas such as: control circuits, combination starters, control devices, special controls, DC motors, AC motors, lighting systems with use of schematics, building drawings, and with emphasis on cutting trouble-shooting time.

ELT 220 Industrial Motion Control 3 ELT 105 or ELT 126

This course covers motion controls as used in real world situations, including PLC, robotics, servos, sensing devices, actuators and controls.

ELT 261 Advanced PLC Programming 2 ELT 260

This course introduces topics that include advanced PLC programming, troubleshooting and data communications.

ELT 274 Electrician’s National Code 3 ELT 150

This course is an extensive study of the national and local electric codes for wiring and apparatuses. It covers wiring design and protection, wiring methods and materials, equipment for general use including motors and controllers, special occupancies such as hazardous location; special equipment such as electric welding and machine tool wiring, and the use of tables and diagrams for the solution of practical wiring problems.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.