Agriculture Technology – Associate in Applied Science

The Agriculture Technology Associate in Applied Science program prepares students for careers in skilled agricultural and agri-business areas. This degree will provide students with the diverse skill set necessary to work competently within the various sectors of the agri-food industry, including: agricultural production (plant or livestock), precision farming, agribusiness and finance, sales management, soil or other conservation management, and food processing.

This degree is designed for students who seek employment in agriculture and agribusiness industries upon graduation from Jackson College. This program of study is not intended for those seeking a four-year or advanced degree in agriculture, natural resources or the natural sciences.

Those wishing to transfer to a four-year institution should pursue the Associate of Science degree, following the Agriculture Transfer program map.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 62
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
AGT 131 Introduction to Plant and Soil Science 4 CEM 141 or NSC 120

This course teaches principles of crop production and soil resource management. It relates soils, crop growth, physiology, and genetics to cultural demands and environmental factors. Lab investigates the identification of plant structures, crop seeds, and important pests. Also explores crop variety selection and traits, deficiency symptoms, crop scouting, basic nutrient calculations, and applications within sustainable and international agriculture.

NSC 120 Fundamentals of Agricultural Science 4 MAT 030 (course can be taken concurrently)

This course is designed for students in the agricultural science degree program. It provides an overview of important concepts in biology and chemistry. Chemistry topics include atomic structure, energy, and acid and base chemistry.  Biology concepts include cellular structure and energy production, biotechnology, evolution, and ecology.  These concepts will be expanded and applied in later courses in the program.  Course includes a lab component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENT 101 Entrepreneurship: Creating Your Own Job 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

There will be only one constant throughout your career, and that constant is change. The preferences of consumers are constantly changing, entire industries are rising and falling, and hard-working people often are finding themselves looking for a job. This course provides you with the foundation to design your own job, whether in the context of an existing organization (i.e., as an “intrapreneur”) or as someone who starts a new enterprise (i.e., as an “entrepreneur”). In this course you will learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses, as well as the key characteristics shared by successful entrepreneurs. You’ll also gain skills for matching your strengths with a business idea that fits you well, so that both you and your customers will benefit. Finally, you will begin developing analytical tools to help make sound decisions in a rapidly-changing world.

AGT 245 Agriculture Internship 2 Instructor permission required

This course offers meaningful industry experience within the agricultural and/or agri-business arena. Specific internship site, industry supervisor and learning outcomes must be jointly agreed upon between the student, the faculty member and the site supervisor. A portfolio of the internship will be created and submitted to the faculty member upon completion of the course.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
AGT 111 Agriculture Safety and Bio Security 1

This course prepares students from a variety of backgrounds to study and work safely in agricultural and agribusiness settings. Students will learn best practices for biological security and workplace safety standard in these industries. Farm safety will include proper use of power equipment and implements as well as livestock handling. This course contains lecture and field experience components.

AGT 113 Introduction to Food Systems 3

This course provides students with an overview of the diverse food systems industry. Through research, guest lectures, and field experiences students will engage a cross-section of agricultural, agribuisiness, governmental and food processing sectors. Emphasis will be made in identifying the unique but deeply inter-connected pieces that make up regional, national and international food systems.

AGT 201 Integrated Pest Management 2 AGT 111 and AGT 131

This course covers identification, biology, and management of agricultural pests including weeds, insects, and diseases. Course content will emphasize prevention, avoidance, monitoring, and control strategies of specific pests, while examining the ecological and economic considerations of integrated pest management within crop production systems.

AGT 209 Precision Farming 1 AGT 111

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of precision management systems intended for food production. Course content will cover mechanical and electronic advancements toward automation, how computers are used in food production, variable rate technology, product application, sensors, global positioning systems, yield monitors & other data collection systems. This course includes both classroom and field experience components.

AGT 212 Agriculture Policy and Practices 1 AGT 111

This course introduces students to applicable state and federal agricultural policy as well as Generally Accepted Agricultural Managment Practices (GAAMP) for both livestock and crop production. Students will become familiar where to locate and how to interpret and apply agricultural policies and best practices.

AGT 227 Introduction to Animal Science 4 AGT 111, and NSC 120 or CEM 141

The classification of different species of livestock based on breeding, feeding, and management techniques and how they apply to overall animal health and behavior are studied. Historical and current trends of the livestock industry both domestically and internationally are examined. The usage of animal science tools in the agriculture field and how they can be used in future career options are highlighted. Course includes 15 hours of field experience.

AGT 231 Agriculture Finance and Management 3 ACC 216 and BUA 220

This course will introduce students to the concepts and organization of the agri-food financing systems, including: financial structures, lenders and borrowers, ownership and legal terminology. Topics will include an overview of financial analysis, cost of production, risk, leverage and feasibility, financial statements and capital costs.

AGT 245 Agriculture Internship 2 Instructor permission required

This course offers meaningful industry experience within the agricultural and/or agri-business arena. Specific internship site, industry supervisor and learning outcomes must be jointly agreed upon between the student, the faculty member and the site supervisor. A portfolio of the internship will be created and submitted to the faculty member upon completion of the course.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
AGT 111 Agriculture Safety and Bio Security 1

This course prepares students from a variety of backgrounds to study and work safely in agricultural and agribusiness settings. Students will learn best practices for biological security and workplace safety standard in these industries. Farm safety will include proper use of power equipment and implements as well as livestock handling. This course contains lecture and field experience components.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

NSC 120 Fundamentals of Agricultural Science 4 MAT 030 (course can be taken concurrently)

This course is designed for students in the agricultural science degree program. It provides an overview of important concepts in biology and chemistry. Chemistry topics include atomic structure, energy, and acid and base chemistry.  Biology concepts include cellular structure and energy production, biotechnology, evolution, and ecology.  These concepts will be expanded and applied in later courses in the program.  Course includes a lab component.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
AGT 131 Introduction to Plant and Soil Science 4 CEM 141 or NSC 120

This course teaches principles of crop production and soil resource management. It relates soils, crop growth, physiology, and genetics to cultural demands and environmental factors. Lab investigates the identification of plant structures, crop seeds, and important pests. Also explores crop variety selection and traits, deficiency symptoms, crop scouting, basic nutrient calculations, and applications within sustainable and international agriculture.

AGT 212 Agriculture Policy and Practices 1 AGT 111

This course introduces students to applicable state and federal agricultural policy as well as Generally Accepted Agricultural Managment Practices (GAAMP) for both livestock and crop production. Students will become familiar where to locate and how to interpret and apply agricultural policies and best practices.

AGT 245 Agriculture Internship 2 Instructor permission required

This course offers meaningful industry experience within the agricultural and/or agri-business arena. Specific internship site, industry supervisor and learning outcomes must be jointly agreed upon between the student, the faculty member and the site supervisor. A portfolio of the internship will be created and submitted to the faculty member upon completion of the course.

ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

AGT 113 Introduction to Food Systems 3

This course provides students with an overview of the diverse food systems industry. Through research, guest lectures, and field experiences students will engage a cross-section of agricultural, agribuisiness, governmental and food processing sectors. Emphasis will be made in identifying the unique but deeply inter-connected pieces that make up regional, national and international food systems.

AGT 201 Integrated Pest Management 2 AGT 111 and AGT 131

This course covers identification, biology, and management of agricultural pests including weeds, insects, and diseases. Course content will emphasize prevention, avoidance, monitoring, and control strategies of specific pests, while examining the ecological and economic considerations of integrated pest management within crop production systems.

ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
AGT 209 Precision Farming 1 AGT 111

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of precision management systems intended for food production. Course content will cover mechanical and electronic advancements toward automation, how computers are used in food production, variable rate technology, product application, sensors, global positioning systems, yield monitors & other data collection systems. This course includes both classroom and field experience components.

AGT 227 Introduction to Animal Science 4 AGT 111, and NSC 120 or CEM 141

The classification of different species of livestock based on breeding, feeding, and management techniques and how they apply to overall animal health and behavior are studied. Historical and current trends of the livestock industry both domestically and internationally are examined. The usage of animal science tools in the agriculture field and how they can be used in future career options are highlighted. Course includes 15 hours of field experience.

AGT 231 Agriculture Finance and Management 3 ACC 216 and BUA 220

This course will introduce students to the concepts and organization of the agri-food financing systems, including: financial structures, lenders and borrowers, ownership and legal terminology. Topics will include an overview of financial analysis, cost of production, risk, leverage and feasibility, financial statements and capital costs.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

ENT 101 Entrepreneurship: Creating Your Own Job 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

There will be only one constant throughout your career, and that constant is change. The preferences of consumers are constantly changing, entire industries are rising and falling, and hard-working people often are finding themselves looking for a job. This course provides you with the foundation to design your own job, whether in the context of an existing organization (i.e., as an “intrapreneur”) or as someone who starts a new enterprise (i.e., as an “entrepreneur”). In this course you will learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses, as well as the key characteristics shared by successful entrepreneurs. You’ll also gain skills for matching your strengths with a business idea that fits you well, so that both you and your customers will benefit. Finally, you will begin developing analytical tools to help make sound decisions in a rapidly-changing world.