Allied Health General Studies – Associate in Applied Science

The Allied Health General Studies program is specifically designed for those who have already earned some form of certification or licensure in an allied health profession and are looking to obtain an associate degree in order to further their education or employment opportunities. Certification or licensure, which must be submitted to determine eligibility, may meet up to 30 credits toward the allied health core requirements. Educational focus options are described below which will provide the opportunity to meet the 33-credit core requirement.

Credits by Credential

Program Requirements

Minimum credits 60
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

BIO 253 and 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8

Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

ENG 236 Women In a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS SOC 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 257 World Literature I 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students compare major themes and writers from Africa, America, Asia and Europe.

FRN 131 Elementary French I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

GER 131 Elementary German I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

HIS 125 African-American History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examines the role African-Americans have historically played in the political, economic and social construction of America.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

MUS 130 Music of Non-Western Cultures 3 ENG 085*

Discovering the music of non-Western cultures through lecture and directed listening.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

SOC 246 Marriage and Family 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The position and significance of marriage and the family in contemporary society are examined. Issues are examined within the larger political, historical and social context, including marriage and family values within diverse ethnic, minority and gender identity groups. SOC 231 recommended before enrolling in this course.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

33 credits must come from approved certification/licensure and additional courses listed under Additional Requirements

CERTIFICATION/LICENSURE EQUIVALENTS

  • CMA(AAMA), RMA(AMT), Paramedic, Pharmacy Technician, and LPN = 30 credits
  • Medical Coder/Biller (CPC) = 18 credits
  • CMAS(AMT) or equivalent as approved = 12 credits
  • Nurse Aide Certification (CNA) = 6 credits
  • Phlebotomy or EKG Tech certification (credentialing body must be approved) = 6 credits

Other allied health certifications may be approved on a case by case basis. Please see program director for approval.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS TO MEET CORE REQUIREMENTS

Health Management Focus

This focus would be for someone who is looking to gain more experience in health management to complement their current medical background. This may also be ideal for someone who may be continuing with a Bachelor’s of Health Management or Human Relations. You may choose any of the following to ensure you meet credit requirements. Please be aware that there may be prerequisite requirements for the courses listed below.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 140 Public Health and Disease 3 ENG 085* ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This lecture/discussion course provides an evidence-based approach to the concepts of public health. Topics covered include infectious and non-infectious diseases along with genetic and environmental factors in health and disease. Students will explore local and national public health resources with an emphasis on how public health data can be used to inform decisions about their own health.

BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

BUA 221 Human Resources Management 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Create and maintain a desirable and productive work place by applying management skills with emphasis on improving performance and career development. Topics include: employment law, recruitment and selection, placement techniques, interview methods, job analysis, staffing, training and development, performance appraisals, team building, benefit administration, government regulation, compensation systems, health and safety, and labor-management issues.

PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

SPN 132 Elementary Spanish II 4 SPN 131

Provides increased practice in the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.


Science Focus

This focus would be for someone who would like to obtain further education in the sciences. You may choose any of the following to ensure you meet credit requirements. Please be aware that there may be prerequisite requirements for the courses listed below

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 140 Public Health and Disease 3 ENG 085* ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This lecture/discussion course provides an evidence-based approach to the concepts of public health. Topics covered include infectious and non-infectious diseases along with genetic and environmental factors in health and disease. Students will explore local and national public health resources with an emphasis on how public health data can be used to inform decisions about their own health.

BIO 161 General Biology I 4 ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Biology 161 is the first semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers nature of science, a survey of the major groups of living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants and animals), the process and evidence for evolution, and the fundamentals of ecology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 162 General Biology II 4 CEM 131 or higher

Biology 162 is the second semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers the chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, molecular and Mendelian genetics, cell division, gene regulation and biotechnology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component. Successful completion of BIO 161 is recommended prior to enrollment .

BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 253

This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

CEM 132 Fundamentals of Organic & Biological Chemistry 4 CEM 131 or CEM 137 or CEM 141

This course is an extension of material covered in CEM 131. It is required in many bachelor’s degree programs, including nursing. Organic topics include the structure, physical properties and chemical behavior of the major classes of organic compounds. The structure, function, formation and reactions of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids are covered, including enzymes, chemical messengers, and biochemical energy production. Course includes a laboratory component.

CEM 142 General Chemistry II 5 CEM 141

This course is the second semester of general chemistry and extends material covered in CEM 141. Covered concepts include chemical thermodynamics, electrochemical reactions, reaction kinetics, acid-base theories, nuclear chemistry, and aqueous solutions with emphasis on equilibrium. Experiments include quantitative methods, stoichiometry, colorimetry, and gravimetric analysis. Course includes a laboratory component.

CEM 241 Organic Chemistry I 5 CEM 142

Comprehensive study of the major classes of organic compounds, their structures and reactions. The stero-chemical properties and spectra (IR and NMR) of molecules and their mechanisms of reactions are stressed. The laboratory experiments demonstrate techniques used in organic reactions, syntheses illustrating types of reactions, analysis of major classes of compounds, and kinetic studies.

CEM 242 Organic Chemistry II 5 CEM 241

A continuation of CEM 241. Course includes a laboratory component.


Psychology / Human Behavior Focus

This focus would be for someone who may want to obtain further education in the area of psychology and social sciences. You may choose any of the following ensure you meet credit requirements. Please be aware that there may be prerequisite requirements for the courses listed below.

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 120 Human Relations in Business 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Effective human relations are an indispensable tool in developing a successful professional presence in today’s world. Topics include self-understanding, as well as the understanding of others, motivation, productivity, morale, conflict and change, stress, ethics, diversity, goal setting, the power of positive reinforcement, image building, emotional control, assertiveness, effective communication and different leadership styles.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

PSY 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

(SAME AS SOC 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences, influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction will be studied.

PSY 161 Introduction to Counseling 3 PSY 140

Learn basic counseling microskills against a backdrop of comparative theories and systems of counseling. Ethical, legal and practical issues included.

PSY 222 Applied Behavior Analysis 3 PSY 140

Methods and techniques for changing behaviors based on learning principles. Includes modeling, simulation, role playing, operant, aversion, fear reduction and self-management methods.

PSY 225 Introduction to Group Therapy 3 PSY 140 and PSY 161, PSY 251 or PSY 252

This course is designed to expose the student to the principles and concepts associate with the conduct of group therapy. The course will be a combination of lecture and application. The course is designed for psychology/social work majors with an interest in clinical application.

PSY 245 Infancy and Childhood 3 PSY 140

Physical, mental, emotional and social development of the human individual from conception through childhood. Genetic, prenatal and postnatal influences on development are examined. Cognitive and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

PSY 251 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 140

Survey of those behaviors that do not fit the norm of society, including causal factors, specific disorders and treatment methods.

PSY 252 Developmental Psychology 3 PSY 140

Principles and theories of human development from conception through adulthood, with applications to foster optimal development. Cognitive, behavioral and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

SOC 117 Criminology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(SAME AS CRJ 117) Provides an understanding of the cultural nature, origin, and development of criminal behavior with attention given to the psychological and sociological factors involved.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

SOC 246 Marriage and Family 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The position and significance of marriage and the family in contemporary society are examined. Issues are examined within the larger political, historical and social context, including marriage and family values within diverse ethnic, minority and gender identity groups. SOC 231 recommended before enrolling in this course.


Entrepreneurship Focus

This focus would be for someone looking to gain the skills and knowledge needed to open their own health related business, such as an assisted living facility. Please be aware that there may be prerequisite requirements for the courses listed below.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 216 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091, MAT 020 or higher

This course is designed for the non-accounting supervisor/manager who must have an understanding of financial and managerial accounting as it is used in decision making. Learn about annual reports, financial statements, balance sheet accounts and accounting transactions. Focus on how accounting information is used in decision making and not on the mechanics behind that accounting information. This is an introductory accounting course required for some BUA, CIS and HOC programs. Students should consider their academic program and select either ACC 216 or ACC 231 for their introductory accounting course.

ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121

This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 220 Principles of Management 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

This management course exposes students to the dynamics of the changing world. Topics such as management functions/processes, quality, leadership styles, power, global issues, and the challenges and opportunities of diversity are included. Emphasis is placed on ethics, decision making, effective communication, evaluating employees, motivational tools, organizational design, environmental scanning, supervising groups, controlling quality, productivity improvement, managing change and conflict, labor relations and time management.

ENT 101 Entrepreneurship: Creating Your Own Job 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

There will be only one constant throughout your career, and that constant is change. The preferences of consumers are constantly changing, entire industries are rising and falling, and hard-working people often are finding themselves looking for a job. This course provides you with the foundation to design your own job, whether in the context of an existing organization (i.e., as an “intrapreneur”) or as someone who starts a new enterprise (i.e., as an “entrepreneur”). In this course you will learn more about your own strengths and weaknesses, as well as the key characteristics shared by successful entrepreneurs. You’ll also gain skills for matching your strengths with a business idea that fits you well, so that both you and your customers will benefit. Finally, you will begin developing analytical tools to help make sound decisions in a rapidly-changing world.

ENT 102 Entrepreneurial Marketing: Finding Your Niche 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 090.

Organizations grow by serving the needs of customers. These needs are frequently changing; at times even the customers themselves don’t accurately express what they need. The key to entrepreneurial success is identifying the underlying needs of specific niches within the changing marketplace and then devising a plan which matches your driving passion and unique capabilities with the specific needs you have identified. This process is entrepreneurial marketing. In this course you will work with market research tools and develop analytical processes for identifying the needs of target customers, and you will produce marketing plans designed to capitalize on your unique advantages in order to delight customers. Simultaneously, you will begin developing a brand identity intended to become the preferred choice among your target customers.

ENT 169 Business Plan 3 ENT 101

The student will be able to evaluate their business concept and write a sound business plan for their entrepreneurial venture. In the process of doing so, the student will be able to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a business concept; collect and organize market research data into a marketing plan; and prepare the financial projects for their business venture. In addition, students will be able to identify and evaluate various resources available for funding the entrepreneurial venture. To be successful in this course, basic computer skills are required.

  • Students can only graduate from this program if they have a health related credential approved by the Program Director (see catalog for examples).
    • Students need to meet with Program Director within their first semester to obtain credential approval or discuss credential to be obtained.
  • Students can bring in outside credentials or earn credentials while at Jackson College.
    • Current students can take any of the following courses which would provide student with eligibility to sit for credentialing exam to earn credit(s) toward degree:
      • HOC135 = Certified EKG Tech (6 credits)
      • HOC145 = Certified Phlebotomy Tech (6 credits)
      • HOC150 = Certified Electronic Health Records Specialist (6 credits)
      • EMS122 = EMT License (12 credits)
  • Students are required to complete certain general education and related courses
  • Students are required to earn 33 credits of AH Core Requirements.
  • Students can earn up to 30 credits depending on credential(s).
  • Students would choose ANY courses from the four focus areas to meet any credits, of the 33 required, not met by credential.
  • Students can take courses from any of the four focus areas which include a (see catalog for course listing):
    • Health Management Focus
    • Science Focus
    • Psychology / Human Behavior Focus
    • Entrepreneurship Focus

Required general education and related program courses that must be completed:

  •   ENG131 or ENG132
  •   COM231, 240 or 250
  •   MAT130 or higher
  •   PSY140
  •   BIO132 or BIO253 & BIO254

Allied Health General Studies Credit Form