Communication – Associate in Arts

The Communication Associate in Arts degree is designed for students to transfer seamlessly to a baccalaureate institution and major in an area such as mass communication or journalism. Communication students apply fundamental communication concepts by crafting messages for business, government, and education organizations, and analyzing relationships between individuals and organizations.


Minimum credits: 60
Minimum grade in all courses: 2.0
Minimum cumulative GPA: 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits: 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

ENG 201 Advanced Composition 3 Instructor Permission Required

An advanced course offering. Selected students practice peer tutoring and research writing. Emphasis is placed on student writing conferences, process writing and standard research methods. End-of-the-semester portfolio of research papers is required. Additionally, all students enrolled in this course work as tutors in the Writing Center.

Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 130 Quantitative Reasoning 4 MAT 030

Quantitative Reasoning develops student skills in analyzing, synthesizing and communicating quantitative information. Cultivates algebraic reasoning and modeling skills through a quantitative literacy lens. Emphasizes critical thinking and the use of multiple strategies in applied contexts. Topics include proportional and statistical reasoning, probability, and evaluation of bias and validity.

MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines; at least one must be a laboratory science course. Non-laboratory science courses

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 140 Public Health and Disease 3 ENG 085* ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This lecture/discussion course provides an evidence-based approach to the concepts of public health. Topics covered include infectious and non-infectious diseases along with genetic and environmental factors in health and disease. Students will explore local and national public health resources with an emphasis on how public health data can be used to inform decisions about their own health.

Laboratory science courses

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 110 Introductory Biology 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Students will investigate the nature of science and critically analyze scientific data. Basic biological concepts including cancer, biostatistics, organic molecules and nutrition, biotechnology, nutrient cycles, and evolution are presented in the context of current issues. This course includes a discussion component which involves reading, critically evaluating, and discussing scientific papers: thus strong college reading and writing skills are recommended. The course is designed for non-science majors and includes a laboratory component.

BIO 158 Environmental Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for environmental science majors. It is also suitable for non-majors interested in environmental topics. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Environmental case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to analyze quantitative environmental data through application. This class has a laboratory component.

CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 131 Conceptual Physics 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Become familiar with basic concepts used in physics to describe and explain various physical phenomena. The course covers the following topics: kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics (the study of force, momentum and energy); the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the basics of physics using a minimum of mathematics. Course includes a laboratory component.

Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 242 Sports in Film and Literature 3 ENG 131

This course is an inquiry into historical and changing role of sports in American culture through novels, essays, biographies, films, documentaries and sports-related poetry.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

COM 234 Public Address 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(FORMERLY SPH 234) Explore the role of the speaker, audience, occasion and the message. Opportunities are offered for participation in all general purposes of speech plus some special occasion speeches. Delivery methods are impromptu, extemporaneous, manuscript and memorized. Outlining, organization, delivery technique and other theories of public address stressed.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

COM 260 Small Group Communication 3

In this course, students will examine small group communication theories and processes by observing and participating in group activities. As group members, students will apply communication theory to enhance their effectiveness as members and leaders

Prerequisite: COM 231 or COM 240

Transfer Electives

Select additional course based on transfer institution and program so degree totals 60 credit hours.