General Sonography – Associate in Applied Science

A sonographer is the allied health professional who, for diagnostic purposes, uses high frequency sound waves to create cross sectional images of the patient’s anatomy. Sonographers work in professional harmony with both the radiologist and the clinical physician. Sonographers are required to demonstrate a great deal of independent judgment.

The general sonography program is an online program accredited by the Commission for Accreditation of Allied Health Educational Programs (CAAHEP) in the United States. It is a program leading to an Associate in Applied Science degree. The curriculum consists of integrated educational and clinical course work with a minimum of 1,350 supervised clinical hours in an approved clinical education affiliate. The program prepares the students for employment in two specialties (abdomen/superficial structures and obstetrics/gynecology) within the field of general sonography; positions are located within hospitals, medical clinics, and other diagnostic imaging institutions. Upon successful completion, students are eligible to apply for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) exams in Physics and Instrumentation, Abdomen and Obstetrics/Gynecology.

There are special admissions requirements to the sonography programs, and it is the student’s responsibility to understand the requirements and adhere to them. Entry into a program is competitive and based on a “point system.” Point values are based on grades earned in prerequisite coursework and the interview process.

Applications are processed according to the following:

• Applications must be received by the Allied Health Office by January 31.
• Diagnostic Medical Sonography Admission Committee conducts consultations.
• Students are notified by mail of application/consultations results.
• Accepted students begin spring semester.

General education prerequisites and related requirement courses must be completed before admission to the program.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 80
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum grade in BIO 132 OR BIO 253/254, HOC 130 AND MOA 120 3.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

BIO 253 and 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8

Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Program courses meet this requirement.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 100 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 3

Students are introduced to the radiologic sciences. Modalities discussed include X-rays, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computerized tomgraphy (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photon emission tomography (PET). Students learn indications for a variety of diagnostic studies, how they are evaluated and interpreted,correlations of multiple studies, and how to prepare the patient for the study.

DMS 104 Introduction to Sonographic Instrumentation 3 ENG 085* and MAT 131* or higher, plus signed DMS fact sheet (EQV-DMSFS)

In this course students will learn the history and basic principles of static and real-time ultrasound machines. The instrumentation of A-mode and its conversion into the real time B-mode scanners will be explored. Laboratory assignments reinforce learning activities.

HOC 130 Introduction to Health Occupations 3

This course will provide the student with an overview of the health care field. Information that is covered serves as a solid foundation for all students in health sciences or health occupations, regardless of the particular health care profession they are interested in pursuing. Topics include: careers in health care, legal and ethical responsibilities, professionalism, interactions between and reaction of patients in normal and altered states, patient and personal safety and cultural diversity.

MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

PHY 145 Introduction to Basic Physics 2 ENG 085 and MAT 020 or higher.

This course addresses the basic principles of classical physics specifically for the sonography program with a minimal amount of mathematics. The topics covered include motion, mechanics, energy, properties of matter, waves, heat, electricity and magnetism.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 101 Sonographic Orientation 3

This course prepares sonography students for their clinical work-site experiences. Students will explore interpersonal relationship skills, ethical decision making, and a review of clinical technical skills as they relate to the on-site work experience. Students will learn basic cross-sectional anatomy as related to beginning sonographic scanning of the abdomen. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DMS program

DMS 105 Sonographic Techniques 3 DMS 101 and DMS 104

This course instructs the DMS student in scan planes, anatomical positioning, scan protocols, scan preparations, scan scheduling, appropriate history recording, correlations with other diagnostic procedures, and the techniques required for initiating and completing diagnostic sonographic procedures of the abdominal, obstetrical and gynecological patients.

DMS 122 Clinical Experience I 6 DMS 101

In this course, students receive supervised clinical work experience in an approved clinical education center. This course provides basic scanning opportunities, patient interviewing techniques, professional attitudes and ethics, and other basic patient/professional situations under the direct supervision of a registered diagnostic medical sonographer (RDMS). Completions of professional and technical scanning proficiencies are required. A minimum of 515 hours are required to complete this course.

DMS 197 Introduction to Clinical 5

This course will allow students to gain basic knowledge and practical skills that are necessary to begin a clinical externship in sonography. Students will study and practice: 1) communication skills as they are applied to the student-to patient/sonographer/physician relationship; 2) patient assessment; and 3) scanning techniques that will be a part of their daily routine in their clinical practice. Admission to the sonography program required to register for this course.

DMS 200 Abdomen and Small Parts Sonography 4

In this course students learn in-depth, cross-sectional anatomy and pathology as related to sonographic scanning of the abdomen and small parts in the adult and pediatric patient. The class gives attention to physiologic and pathological changes of specific, non-specific diseases, and trauma as they relate to sonographic interpretation of the abdomen and small parts. Mastery level achievement is encouraged and expected.

DMS 201 Obstetric and Gynecologic Sonography 4

Students learn in-depth, cross-sectional anatomy and pathology as related to sonographic scanning of the pelvis in the adult and pediatric patient, and the gravid uterus. The class gives attention to physiologic and pathological changes of specific, non-specific diseases, and trauma as they relate to sonographic interpretation of the pelvis and gravid uterus. Mastery level achievement is encouraged and expected.

DMS 206 Sonographic Instrumentation 4

Students explore the mechanics of A-mode, B-mode, M-mode, Doppler, and real time equipment. Accessory equipment such as cameras, transducers, phased, annular and linear arrays, and all types of hard copy documentation instruments are investigated. Multiple methods of preventative maintenance and quality control are presented. Laboratory reinforces learning activities.

DMS 212 Comprehensive Sonography 4

This course includes advanced scanning practices with introduction to cardiac, peripheral vascular, neurosonography, breast, prostate, and musculoskeletal scanning. Invasive procedures and intra-operative scanning protocols and techniques will be enhanced upon. Opportunity and aid is given for ARDMS board applications. Extensive review of all facets of sonography is included in preparation for the ARDMS board exams.

DMS 223 Clinical Experience II 6 DMS 122 and DMS 200

This course includes supervised clinical experience in an approved clinical education center, advanced scanning techniques to demonstrate cross-sectional anatomy and pathology of specific and non-specific disease and traumatic changes. Specific attention is given to fetal development, fetal anomalies, abnormal prenatal and maternal conditions as they relate to sonographic scanning and interpreting of images. Although the student is still under the supervision of a RDMS professional, the student is expected to perform sonographic procedures independently as a regular portion of this course. The completion of professional and technical scanning proficiencies is required. A minimum of 515 clinical hours are required for successful completion of this course.

DMS 224 Clinical Experience III 6 DMS 201 and DMS 223

This course includes supervised clinical experience in an approved clinical education center. Advanced scanning procedures, methods and experience are provided in this course. Students experience advanced scanning modalities via M-mode, Doppler, 3D, real-time and invasive procedures. Comparative interpretations of sonographic imaging with other diagnostic imaging modalities are provided. Students are expected to initiate, perform, and complete all sonographic procedures with direct supervision by a RDMS. The successful completion of professional and technical scanning proficiencies is required. A minimum of 320 clinical hours are required to successfully complete this course.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

DMS 100 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 3

Students are introduced to the radiologic sciences. Modalities discussed include X-rays, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computerized tomgraphy (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photon emission tomography (PET). Students learn indications for a variety of diagnostic studies, how they are evaluated and interpreted,correlations of multiple studies, and how to prepare the patient for the study.

DMS 104 Introduction to Sonographic Instrumentation 3 ENG 085* and MAT 131* or higher, plus signed DMS fact sheet (EQV-DMSFS)

In this course students will learn the history and basic principles of static and real-time ultrasound machines. The instrumentation of A-mode and its conversion into the real time B-mode scanners will be explored. Laboratory assignments reinforce learning activities.

DMS 108 Essentials of Sonography 3

This course will address the high priorities in the health care field such as good character, strong work ethic and professional traits and behaviors that apply to all health care workers. Affective domain, as well as the ability to process and understand physical relationships among objects, will be assessed through scanning exercises.

HOC 130 Introduction to Health Occupations 3

This course will provide the student with an overview of the health care field. Information that is covered serves as a solid foundation for all students in health sciences or health occupations, regardless of the particular health care profession they are interested in pursuing. Topics include: careers in health care, legal and ethical responsibilities, professionalism, interactions between and reaction of patients in normal and altered states, patient and personal safety and cultural diversity.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

PHY 145 Introduction to Basic Physics 2 ENG 085 and MAT 020 or higher.

This course addresses the basic principles of classical physics specifically for the sonography program with a minimal amount of mathematics. The topics covered include motion, mechanics, energy, properties of matter, waves, heat, electricity and magnetism.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 101 Sonographic Orientation 3

This course prepares sonography students for their clinical work-site experiences. Students will explore interpersonal relationship skills, ethical decision making, and a review of clinical technical skills as they relate to the on-site work experience. Students will learn basic cross-sectional anatomy as related to beginning sonographic scanning of the abdomen. Prerequisite: Acceptance into DMS program

DMS 197 Introduction to Clinical 5

This course will allow students to gain basic knowledge and practical skills that are necessary to begin a clinical externship in sonography. Students will study and practice: 1) communication skills as they are applied to the student-to patient/sonographer/physician relationship; 2) patient assessment; and 3) scanning techniques that will be a part of their daily routine in their clinical practice. Admission to the sonography program required to register for this course.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 105 Sonographic Techniques 3 DMS 101 and DMS 104

This course instructs the DMS student in scan planes, anatomical positioning, scan protocols, scan preparations, scan scheduling, appropriate history recording, correlations with other diagnostic procedures, and the techniques required for initiating and completing diagnostic sonographic procedures of the abdominal, obstetrical and gynecological patients.

DMS 122 Clinical Experience I 6 DMS 101

In this course, students receive supervised clinical work experience in an approved clinical education center. This course provides basic scanning opportunities, patient interviewing techniques, professional attitudes and ethics, and other basic patient/professional situations under the direct supervision of a registered diagnostic medical sonographer (RDMS). Completions of professional and technical scanning proficiencies are required. A minimum of 515 hours are required to complete this course.

DMS 200 Abdomen and Small Parts Sonography 4

In this course students learn in-depth, cross-sectional anatomy and pathology as related to sonographic scanning of the abdomen and small parts in the adult and pediatric patient. The class gives attention to physiologic and pathological changes of specific, non-specific diseases, and trauma as they relate to sonographic interpretation of the abdomen and small parts. Mastery level achievement is encouraged and expected.

SEMESTER 6

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 201 Obstetric and Gynecologic Sonography 4

Students learn in-depth, cross-sectional anatomy and pathology as related to sonographic scanning of the pelvis in the adult and pediatric patient, and the gravid uterus. The class gives attention to physiologic and pathological changes of specific, non-specific diseases, and trauma as they relate to sonographic interpretation of the pelvis and gravid uterus. Mastery level achievement is encouraged and expected.

DMS 206 Sonographic Instrumentation 4

Students explore the mechanics of A-mode, B-mode, M-mode, Doppler, and real time equipment. Accessory equipment such as cameras, transducers, phased, annular and linear arrays, and all types of hard copy documentation instruments are investigated. Multiple methods of preventative maintenance and quality control are presented. Laboratory reinforces learning activities.

DMS 223 Clinical Experience II 6 DMS 122 and DMS 200

This course includes supervised clinical experience in an approved clinical education center, advanced scanning techniques to demonstrate cross-sectional anatomy and pathology of specific and non-specific disease and traumatic changes. Specific attention is given to fetal development, fetal anomalies, abnormal prenatal and maternal conditions as they relate to sonographic scanning and interpreting of images. Although the student is still under the supervision of a RDMS professional, the student is expected to perform sonographic procedures independently as a regular portion of this course. The completion of professional and technical scanning proficiencies is required. A minimum of 515 clinical hours are required for successful completion of this course.

SEMESTER 7

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 212 Comprehensive Sonography 4

This course includes advanced scanning practices with introduction to cardiac, peripheral vascular, neurosonography, breast, prostate, and musculoskeletal scanning. Invasive procedures and intra-operative scanning protocols and techniques will be enhanced upon. Opportunity and aid is given for ARDMS board applications. Extensive review of all facets of sonography is included in preparation for the ARDMS board exams.

DMS 224 Clinical Experience III 6 DMS 201 and DMS 223

This course includes supervised clinical experience in an approved clinical education center. Advanced scanning procedures, methods and experience are provided in this course. Students experience advanced scanning modalities via M-mode, Doppler, 3D, real-time and invasive procedures. Comparative interpretations of sonographic imaging with other diagnostic imaging modalities are provided. Students are expected to initiate, perform, and complete all sonographic procedures with direct supervision by a RDMS. The successful completion of professional and technical scanning proficiencies is required. A minimum of 320 clinical hours are required to successfully complete this course.