Radiography – Associate in Applied Science

A radiographer is the allied health professional who uses ionizing radiation to image patients in hospitals and various health clinical settings. Radiographers perform general x-ray imaging of the body and may also go on to perform advanced imaging procedures such as CT, MRI, mammography and more.

It is a two-year program leading to an Associate in Applied Science degree. The curriculum consists of integrated didactic and clinical course work in an approved clinical education affiliate. The program is designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of diagnostic radiography. Positions are located within hospitals, medical clinics and other diagnostic imaging institutions. Upon successful completion, students are eligible to write the American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT) exams. Satisfactory completion of the ARRT board certifying exams allows the radiographer to use the initials of R.T. (R), Registered Technologist (Radiography).

There are special admission requirements to the radiography programs, and it is the student’s responsibility to understand the requirements and adhere to them. Entry into a program is competitive and based on a “point system.” Point values are based on grades earned in prerequisite coursework and theinterview process.

Applications are processed according to the following:
• Applications must be received by the Allied Health Office by January 31.
• Radiography Admission Committee conducts interviews.
• Students are notified by mail of application/interview results.
• Accepted students begin spring semester.

BIO 132 OR BIO 253 AND BIO 254, DMS 100, HOC 130 AND MOA 120 must be successfully completed before applying to the program.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 82
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum grade in BIO 132 OR BIO 253/254, DMS 100, HOC 130 AND MOA 120 3.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

BIO 253 and 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8

Human Anatomy and Physiology I
This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Program courses meet this requirement

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
DMS 100 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 3

Students are introduced to the radiologic sciences. Modalities discussed include X-rays, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computerized tomgraphy (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photon emission tomography (PET). Students learn indications for a variety of diagnostic studies, how they are evaluated and interpreted,correlations of multiple studies, and how to prepare the patient for the study.

HOC 130 Introduction to Health Occupations 3

This course will provide the student with an overview of the health care field. Information that is covered serves as a solid foundation for all students in health sciences or health occupations, regardless of the particular health care profession they are interested in pursuing. Topics include: careers in health care, legal and ethical responsibilities, professionalism, interactions between and reaction of patients in normal and altered states, patient and personal safety and cultural diversity.

MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 120 Radiologic Orientation 2

This course orientates students to the field of radiography. Students are prepared to enter the hospital setting. Hospital personnel, departments, history, and means of operation are discussed. The moral, legal, and professional rights and responsibilities of a radiographer are a focus.

RAD 121 Radiographic Positioning I 4

Students learn to formulate and apply a working knowledge of radiographic positioning and human anatomy. The student will learn to select and employ the correct procedure process during a radiographic examination and prepare to implement this knowledge in a clinical setting. The course covers anatomy and positioning of the chest, upper airway, abdomen, upper & lower extremity. Students will actively practice in a lab setting with a lab instructor.

RAD 125 Radiographic Positioning II 4 RAD 121

Students will continue to formulate and apply a working knowledge of radiographic positioning and human anatomy. The students will learn to select and employ the correct procedure process during a radiographic examination and prepare to implement this knowledge in a clinical setting. This course will cover the bony thorax, spine, head, gastrointestinal tract, as well as urinary imaging.

RAD 126 Clinical Practicum I 3 RAD 121

Clinical experience is provided in this course under the direct supervision of ARRT-registered radiographers. Clinical competencies will be given corresponding to the exams completed in the classroom. Performance standards are used to evaluate the student’s progress.

RAD 160 Fundamentals of Radiologic Science 4 RAD 126

This course will teach the student about the physics of radiology. The basic principles of electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic energy will be covered. This knowledge will help to provide an understanding of how a quality diagnostic radiograph is created, while taking into account safe exposure factors for a patient. Students will understand how x-rays are created and how they interact with tissues and matter. A clear understanding of the fundamentals of physics is the starting point for becoming a superior radiologic technologist.

RAD 161 Radiographic Exposure 4 RAD 126

This course will study in depth the four radiographic qualities of density, contrast, recorded detail and distortion. Factors that affect the four radiographic qualities will be discussed. Students will learn mathematical formulas that aid them in better understanding these factors. Lab and group performance will be utilized to help students learn and understand the content.

RAD 162 Clinical Practicum II 3 RAD 126

Continuation of Clinical Practicum I.

RAD 209 Cross Sectional Imaging 3 RAD 125

This course is designed to prepare imaging students for CT and MRI imaging. Students will learn how to identify and assess cross-sectional images. Expectations of radiologists and physicians will be clearly delineated in the course. Students that complete this course successfully will be better prepared for rotations in CT and/or MRI imaging.

RAD 211 Clinical Practicum III 6 RAD 162

Continuation of Clinical Practicum II.

RAD 212 Special Radiographic Studies 4 RAD 160

This course will provide a detailed study of special radiographic procedures. The course will discuss the role of the technologist, equipment required in various procedures, and concerns of the technologist when performing these exams. The course also discusses radiation protection and health physics. This course will provide direction to students for registry preparation.

RAD 213 Radiobiology 2 RAD 211

Students review the basics of cell biology and study the basic biologic interaction of radiation. That study will include cellular and tissue response to radiation, as well as radiation pathology, the total body radiation response, and the late effects of radiation. It will conclude with a discussion of clinical radiobiology that includes diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and therapeutic radiology.

RAD 214 Clinical Practicum IV 5 RAD 211

Continuation of Clinical Practicum III.

RAD 218 Radiographic Pathology 3 RAD 213

This course will introduce the student radiographer to pathology. Students will learn about how differing pathologies occur and how they present themselves radiographically. The course will also discuss how differing pathologies affect the radiographic procedure itself.

RAD 219 Clinical Practicum V 5 RAD 214

Continuation of Clinical Practicum IV.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

HOC 130 Introduction to Health Occupations 3

This course will provide the student with an overview of the health care field. Information that is covered serves as a solid foundation for all students in health sciences or health occupations, regardless of the particular health care profession they are interested in pursuing. Topics include: careers in health care, legal and ethical responsibilities, professionalism, interactions between and reaction of patients in normal and altered states, patient and personal safety and cultural diversity.

MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

DMS 100 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 3

Students are introduced to the radiologic sciences. Modalities discussed include X-rays, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, computerized tomgraphy (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photon emission tomography (PET). Students learn indications for a variety of diagnostic studies, how they are evaluated and interpreted,correlations of multiple studies, and how to prepare the patient for the study.

MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 120 Radiologic Orientation 2

This course orientates students to the field of radiography. Students are prepared to enter the hospital setting. Hospital personnel, departments, history, and means of operation are discussed. The moral, legal, and professional rights and responsibilities of a radiographer are a focus.

RAD 121 Radiographic Positioning I 4

Students learn to formulate and apply a working knowledge of radiographic positioning and human anatomy. The student will learn to select and employ the correct procedure process during a radiographic examination and prepare to implement this knowledge in a clinical setting. The course covers anatomy and positioning of the chest, upper airway, abdomen, upper & lower extremity. Students will actively practice in a lab setting with a lab instructor.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 125 Radiographic Positioning II 4 RAD 121

Students will continue to formulate and apply a working knowledge of radiographic positioning and human anatomy. The students will learn to select and employ the correct procedure process during a radiographic examination and prepare to implement this knowledge in a clinical setting. This course will cover the bony thorax, spine, head, gastrointestinal tract, as well as urinary imaging.

RAD 126 Clinical Practicum I 3 RAD 121

Clinical experience is provided in this course under the direct supervision of ARRT-registered radiographers. Clinical competencies will be given corresponding to the exams completed in the classroom. Performance standards are used to evaluate the student’s progress.

SEMESTER 6

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 160 Fundamentals of Radiologic Science 4 RAD 126

This course will teach the student about the physics of radiology. The basic principles of electricity, magnetism and electromagnetic energy will be covered. This knowledge will help to provide an understanding of how a quality diagnostic radiograph is created, while taking into account safe exposure factors for a patient. Students will understand how x-rays are created and how they interact with tissues and matter. A clear understanding of the fundamentals of physics is the starting point for becoming a superior radiologic technologist.

RAD 161 Radiographic Exposure 4 RAD 126

This course will study in depth the four radiographic qualities of density, contrast, recorded detail and distortion. Factors that affect the four radiographic qualities will be discussed. Students will learn mathematical formulas that aid them in better understanding these factors. Lab and group performance will be utilized to help students learn and understand the content.

RAD 162 Clinical Practicum II 3 RAD 126

Continuation of Clinical Practicum I.

SEMESTER 7

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 209 Cross Sectional Imaging 3 RAD 125

This course is designed to prepare imaging students for CT and MRI imaging. Students will learn how to identify and assess cross-sectional images. Expectations of radiologists and physicians will be clearly delineated in the course. Students that complete this course successfully will be better prepared for rotations in CT and/or MRI imaging.

RAD 211 Clinical Practicum III 6 RAD 162

Continuation of Clinical Practicum II.

SEMESTER 8

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 212 Special Radiographic Studies 4 RAD 160

This course will provide a detailed study of special radiographic procedures. The course will discuss the role of the technologist, equipment required in various procedures, and concerns of the technologist when performing these exams. The course also discusses radiation protection and health physics. This course will provide direction to students for registry preparation.

RAD 213 Radiobiology 2 RAD 211

Students review the basics of cell biology and study the basic biologic interaction of radiation. That study will include cellular and tissue response to radiation, as well as radiation pathology, the total body radiation response, and the late effects of radiation. It will conclude with a discussion of clinical radiobiology that includes diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and therapeutic radiology.

RAD 214 Clinical Practicum IV 5 RAD 211

Continuation of Clinical Practicum III.

SEMESTER 9

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
RAD 218 Radiographic Pathology 3 RAD 213

This course will introduce the student radiographer to pathology. Students will learn about how differing pathologies occur and how they present themselves radiographically. The course will also discuss how differing pathologies affect the radiographic procedure itself.

RAD 219 Clinical Practicum V 5 RAD 214

Continuation of Clinical Practicum IV.