Environmental Science – Associate in Applied Science

The Environmental Science Associate Degree prepares students to transfer to, or enroll in, four-year institutions as science majors. People that enter the environmental sciences can expect positions in water quality testing; ecological testing; laboratory science; natural resources and conservation; environmental engineering; renewable energy; outdoor and environmental education; environmental law, policy and regulation; environmental advocacy; international environmental science; environmental science in higher education, environmental management and administration; public relations and communications.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 60
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

ENG 201 Advanced Composition 3 Instructor Permission Required

An advanced course offering. Selected students practice peer tutoring and research writing. Emphasis is placed on student writing conferences, process writing and standard research methods. End-of-the-semester portfolio of research papers is required. Additionally, all students enrolled in this course work as tutors in the Writing Center.

ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 141 Pre-Calculus 5 MAT 139*

Major emphasis is on the concept of functions. Study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, their properties, graphs, and related equations and applications. Additional topics include systems of equations, matrices, conic sections, sequences and series, and probability. A graphing calculator is required and used extensively. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 151 Calculus I 4 MAT 141*

(FORMERLY MTH 151) First calculus course for business, mathematics, engineering and science students explores introductory plane analytic geometry, the derivative, the integral and their applications for algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam should be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

MAT 154 Calculus II 5 MAT 151*

(FORMERLY MTH 154) This course explores the following topics: methods and applications of the derivative and integral for inverse trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, indeterminate forms, series and polar/parametric representation of functions. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, the recommendation is the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 158 Environmental Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for environmental science majors. It is also suitable for non-majors interested in environmental topics. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Environmental case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to analyze quantitative environmental data through application. This class has a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

HIS 131 Western Civilization to 1555 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course examines the roots of Western culture and its development through the Reformation. The course also surveys the social, philosophical, scientific, artistic, religious and political setting evolution with emphasis on the role of ideas and their consequences in the history of the human kind from the beginning to the 16th century.

HIS 132 Western Civilization 1555 to Present 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course is a continuation of HIS 131, emphasizing the development of new political areas, economic and social theories, the evolution and expansion of modern states, and efforts to control international tensions from the 16th century to the present.

HIS 231 Development of the U.S. through the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course is the study of American national history beginning with the colonization to the Civil War. Themes include exploration and settlement, development of political theory, development of the West and its influence on the country, the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.

HIS 232 Development of the U.S. from the Civil War 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course examines the period from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present day. It emphasizes: industrial, commercial and agricultural expansion; intellectual currents; outstanding social changes; the nation’s expanding role in the world affairs, and the Cold War.

HIS 235 20th Century History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examination of national and international developments in the past century focusing on such matters as colonialism, global warfare, and emerging nations, appearance and disappearance of communism. In addition, polarization of wealth and power, the revolution in technology, communication, businesses and industry, the conflict between the globalization movement and national tendencies will be examined.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

PSY 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

(SAME AS SOC 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences, influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction will be studied.

PSY 245 Infancy and Childhood 3 PSY 140

Physical, mental, emotional and social development of the human individual from conception through childhood. Genetic, prenatal and postnatal influences on development are examined. Cognitive and social learning theories are used to integrate research findings.

PSY 251 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 140

Survey of those behaviors that do not fit the norm of society, including causal factors, specific disorders and treatment methods.

PSY 290 Human Sexuality 3 PSY 140

Physiological, psychological and sociocultural influences on human sexuality, including gender, sexual maturation and behavior, identity, values, orientation, relationships, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual disorders and therapy.

SOC 152 Social Psychology 3 PSY 140 or SOC 231

(SAME AS PSY 152) Theoretical synthesis of social influences, including attitude formation, social and cognitive development, aggression, prosocial behavior, prejudice, conformity, culture and gender differences/influences, group processes and interpersonal attraction.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

ENG 236 Women In a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS SOC 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

ENG 249 African-American Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Survey of the literature of African-American writers. Emphasis is on the major writers in narrative, poetry, fiction, essay and drama.

ENG 257 World Literature I 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students compare major themes and writers from Africa, America, Asia and Europe.

FRN 131 Elementary French I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

GEO 132 World Regions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course covers all regions of the world from a human perspective. Topics include resources, population, settlements, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation. There is special emphasis on Internet research in the classroom.

GER 131 Elementary German I 4 ENG 085*

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

HIS 125 African-American History 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Examines the role African-Americans have historically played in the political, economic and social construction of America.

HIS 211 Minority Groups in America 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Sociology of dominant-minority relations in contemporary American society. Attention to specific ethnic, religious, and racial minorities in terms of prejudice and discrimination.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 130 Music of Non-Western Cultures 3 ENG 085*

Discovering the music of non-Western cultures through lecture and directed listening.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SOC 236 Women in a Changing Society 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

(SAME AS ENG 236) Inquiry into historical and changing roles of women, looking at causes of these changes and their effects on women and society through literature, sociology, biology and history.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 258 Field Ecology 5 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MTH 033* or higher

This course is designed to provide hands-on field research experiences in ecology and environmental science. Students will be introduced to quantitative field science methodology, natural history, current research issues, and will participate in data collection for ongoing research projects. The ecological concepts that underlie modern hypothesis tests in ecology will be explored through discussions, readings and field research activities. Conducting regionally-based ecological projects with ecological mathematical methods are a major component of this course. People highly allergic to poison ivy, insects, molds or pollen need to take precautionary steps during field studies.

PHL 236 Ethics 3 ENG 131

In this course, students will examine various questions concerning the status of ethical judgments and become familiar with certain approaches to ethics that have been influential in Western philosophy, including Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue-based ethical theories. In addition, students will consider how these approaches can be employed in ethical decision-making.

Choose two of the following, depending on professional goals or transfer institution requirements:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 231 General Botany 4 BIO 110, BIO 161 or BIO 162

(FORMERLY BIO 151) Emphasizes the development, anatomy, physiology and evolution of angiosperms. A survey of the plant kingdom with representative life cycles stresses relationships among plant groups. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 232 General Zoology 4 BIO 110, BIO 161 or BIO 162

(FORMERLY BIO 152) A comparative study of the anatomical and evolutionary relationships of the major animal phyla with emphasis on development, structure and function of vertebrate systems. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

GEL 160 Introduction to Geology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The course covers minerals, rocks, earthquakes and volcanoes. It also covers the landscapes and behaviors of continents and oceans. Diagrams, photographs, topographic maps, Internet resources and hands-on exercises are utilized to support the concepts. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 131 Physical Geography 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The course begins with maps and grid systems. Map exercises are used all semester to enhance the textbook. Other topics include meteorology, vegetation, earth materials and a range of tectonic and landscape subjects.

Choose two of the following, depending on professional goals or transfer institution requirements:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 161 General Biology I 4 ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Biology 161 is the first semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers nature of science, a survey of the major groups of living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants and animals), the process and evidence for evolution, and the fundamentals of ecology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 162 General Biology II 4 CEM 131 or higher

Biology 162 is the second semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers the chemical basis of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, molecular and Mendelian genetics, cell division, gene regulation and biotechnology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component. Successful completion of BIO 161 is recommended prior to enrollment .

CEM 141 General Chemistry I 5 CIS 095*, ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 131* or higher

This course is required for most sciences, engineering, and pre-professional health majors. Students who are required to take organic chemistry for their major should enroll in CEM 141 during their first semester. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, states of matter, kinetic molecular theory and stoichiometry. Course includes a laboratory component.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES

Choose from the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ALT 200 Principles of Alternative Energy 3 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

(SAME AS ELT 160) This course will introduce students to alternative energy systems and their design and applications. The course will focus primarily on wind turbines, solar systems, and hydrogen fuel cells. A basic understanding of electricity is highly recommended.

ART 103 Drawing I: Foundations 3

This course introduces basic drawing principles and techniques in a studio setting. Students explore contour and tonal drawing using various subjects and media in both observational and conceptual drawings. Projects will incorporate a variety of ability levels, as well as traditional and non-traditional media (including digital images). Students will draw from a nude model. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving, understanding the creative process (from idea to finished product), and addressing visual and conceptual themes are essential parts of the course, reflected in the studio projects. An end of semester portfolio represents students’ growth and artistic development.

ART 121 Ceramics I: Foundations 3

A general overview of ceramics that focuses on a variety of hand building techniques as well as wheelwork and finishes.

ART 152 Painting I: Design & Color 3 ART 103

The elements and principles of design and color are introduced to create basic painting composition in a studio setting. Emphasis is given to techniques using acrylics and/or watercolor media. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving, understanding the creative process (from idea to finished product), and addressing visual and conceptual themes are essential parts of the course, reflected in the studio projects. Students will paint from a nude model. Gallery trips, as well as other field experiences, are key aspects of this course. Students work with the instructor to mount an end of semester exhibition, showcasing their artistic growth and development.

ART 205 Drawing II: Figure & Composition 3 ART 103

Students learn the elements and principles of drawing from life, with the emphasis on basic anatomy and advanced compositional elements. Projects incorporate advanced techniques and nontraditional media in a studio setting. Students will draw from a nude model. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving, understanding the creative process (from idea to finished product), and addressing visual and conceptual themes are essential parts of the course. These skills are reflected in studio projects.

ART 240 Printmaking 3 ART 101 or ART 103

The elements and principles of design and color are introduced to create prints in a studio setting. Emphasis is given to techniques using a variety of media and technologies. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving, understanding the creative process (from idea to finished product), and addressing visual and conceptual themes are essential parts of the course, reflected in the studio projects. Gallery trips, as well as other field experiences are key aspects of this course. Students work with the instructor to mount an end of semester exhibition, showcasing their artistic growth and development.

BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

CIS 137 Digital Photography I 3

(SAME AS ART 137) This course demonstrates how to use and handle a digital camera, capturing the image, editing and processing images for output — such as printing, or preparing images for upload to the internet for websites or social media platforms. The class will include techniques and instruction on layout, composition, rules of design, history of photography, and Photoshop® or image altering program applications.

CIS 201 Advanced Information Technologies 3 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and CIS 101*

(SAME AS ECM 201) This course enhances electronic communication skills and computer concepts essential to using current advanced information technologies. Topics include web collaboration, web conferencing, web 2.0 applications, social media, mobile computing, file conversions and cross-platform compatibility.

CIS 237 Digital Photography II 3 ART 137 or CIS 137

(SAME AS ART 237) This course provides the opportunity to refine and extend the skills of photographic seeing. Personal skills in digital photography will be used to explore a complete body of work. Students will be using Photoshop® CS5 to edit and explore their creative outlets further. Students’ individual personal goals will be set and executed during the semester.

COM 233 Argumentation & Debate 3 COM 231

Students are provided theory and practice in debate, emphasizing principles of research, logical reasoning, and oral presentation of reasoned discourse in group situations. Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

ECN 231 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers macroeconomics and explains the operation of free markets, the role of government in the economy, measurement of the national product, inflation and unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth.

ECN 232 Microeconomics 3 ENG 101* and MAT 135 (Preferred), MAT 133 or MAT 139 Accepted

This course covers microeconomics: the market structure of firms operating in competition and monopoly, labor markets and unions, how income is distributed, current economic problems, international economics, and alternative economic systems.

EDU 100 Pre-teaching Pathway 3 ENG 085*

A career track introduction to the teaching profession designed for students with basic skill levels in reading, writing and math/science. Experiences in the course will include an introduction to: professional portfolio, teaching professionalism and technology. Students will begin the professional career path with grades pre-K to 12 field experiences and professional pathway planning, as well as investigating opportunities in the field of teacher education.

EDU 221 Exploring Teaching 3 ENG 131

“What are the things prospective teachers beginning their formal study of teacher education should know?” Students will gain knowledge of the role of a professional teacher and education topics: schools, diverse students and their needs, historical and current education issues and trends, as well as philosophical and legal foundations in American education. Students will explore and experience key concepts and skills through reading, research, presentation of a lesson, development of a professional portfolio and a teaching philosophy, documented technology and education site-based field experiences. Minimum of 16 hours field experience is included.

EGR 153 Engineering Drawing 4

Students examine the communication aspects of graphics emphasizing sketching and computer-aided drafting and design. This course covers simple pictorial and working drawings, orthographic and isometric projections, an introduction to the mechanical design process, the basics of free hand sketching and of computer aided drafting (CAD), and the computer as a design tool.

HOC 110 Advanced First Aid & American Heart CPR 2

This course provides instruction in adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation, as well as advanced first aid. It is designed to prepare an individual to handle medical or accidental emergencies until professional help arrives or until the victim can seek help, and to handle minor injuries that do not require professional assistance. Upon successful completion of this course, the student is qualified to receive CPR and Advanced First Aid certificates through the American Heart Association (AHA) and American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS).

ENG 261 Creative Writing I 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students experiment with writing poetry, fiction, drama and creative nonfiction for discussion and criticism. Students invent, collaborate and revise before submitting a portfolio of their work. Contemporary readings and visiting authors/videos enhance the class, but primary attention is given to students’ creative writing process.

MAT 251 Calculus III 4 MAT 154

(FORMERLY MTH 251) Solid analytical geometry is integrated throughout this course covering the calculus of vector valued functions, multivariable functions, and vector fields with applications. Graphing calculator required. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

PHL 232 Logic 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course gives you a background in both informal and formal logic. Informal logic, which is derived from everyday types of discussions and arguments, is dealt with first. Topics included are the nature of arguments in general, statistical arguments, and fallacies (bad arguments). Formal logic involves dealing with arguments in an artificial language and is the ancestor of digital computers and every computer programming language. You will learn how to manipulate the artificial language and construct relatively simple proofs.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 158 Environmental Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for environmental science majors. It is also suitable for non-majors interested in environmental topics. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience, environmental surveys, and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Environmental case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to analyze quantitative environmental data through application. This class has a laboratory component.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

MAT 131 Intermediate Algebra 4 MAT 039*

(FORMERLY MTH 131) This course emphasizes simplifying expressions, solving equations, and graphing functions, including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic. Problem solving and mathematical modeling are integrated throughout. Appropriate technology includes a graphing calculator. The mathematics department recommends the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old the recommendation is the course placement assessment be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

BIO 161 General Biology I 4 ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

Biology 161 is the first semester of a one-year general biology experience intended for science majors or pre-professional students. This course covers nature of science, a survey of the major groups of living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants and animals), the process and evidence for evolution, and the fundamentals of ecology. It provides the foundation for upper level biology courses. This course includes a laboratory component.

ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

STM 101 Introduction to Sustainability 3 CIS 095, ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will familiarize themselves with the environmental issues facing our community, state, country and planet. This course will provide meaning to the term “sustainability” in order to build skills that will help the leaders of tomorrow protect the earth’s resources and meet the needs of humanity indefinitely. It is an introduction to both the scientific and social sides of the environmental problems the world faces, with a specific aim at establishing a foundation in environmental comprehension and for further learning within the topic of sustainability.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 103 Drawing I: Foundations 3

This course introduces basic drawing principles and techniques in a studio setting. Students explore contour and tonal drawing using various subjects and media in both observational and conceptual drawings. Projects will incorporate a variety of ability levels, as well as traditional and non-traditional media (including digital images). Students will draw from a nude model. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving, understanding the creative process (from idea to finished product), and addressing visual and conceptual themes are essential parts of the course, reflected in the studio projects. An end of semester portfolio represents students’ growth and artistic development.

CEM 142 General Chemistry II 5 CEM 141

This course is the second semester of general chemistry and extends material covered in CEM 141. Covered concepts include chemical thermodynamics, electrochemical reactions, reaction kinetics, acid-base theories, nuclear chemistry, and aqueous solutions with emphasis on equilibrium. Experiments include quantitative methods, stoichiometry, colorimetry, and gravimetric analysis. Course includes a laboratory component.

COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 231)

PHY 231 College Physics I 4 MAT 131 or higher

Pre-professional and engineering technology students explore kinematics, mechanics, dynamics, thermodynamics, acoustics and general wave motion. Course includes a laboratory component.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 258 Field Ecology 5 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MTH 033* or higher

This course is designed to provide hands-on field research experiences in ecology and environmental science. Students will be introduced to quantitative field science methodology, natural history, current research issues, and will participate in data collection for ongoing research projects. The ecological concepts that underlie modern hypothesis tests in ecology will be explored through discussions, readings and field research activities. Conducting regionally-based ecological projects with ecological mathematical methods are a major component of this course. People highly allergic to poison ivy, insects, molds or pollen need to take precautionary steps during field studies.

BUA 121 Leadership 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Both knowledge and behavior contribute to effective leadership skills needed to enhance the contribution of your team. Students explore topics including shared vision and values, team building, and decision making. You will study leadership theory in ways that encourage development of your leadership skills, including effective use of power and influence, motivational tools, personality assessment, team communication, role modeling, and performance appraisals.

ENG 201 Advanced Composition 3 Instructor Permission Required

An advanced course offering. Selected students practice peer tutoring and research writing. Emphasis is placed on student writing conferences, process writing and standard research methods. End-of-the-semester portfolio of research papers is required. Additionally, all students enrolled in this course work as tutors in the Writing Center.

MAT 141 Pre-Calculus 5 MAT 139*

Major emphasis is on the concept of functions. Study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, their properties, graphs, and related equations and applications. Additional topics include systems of equations, matrices, conic sections, sequences and series, and probability. A graphing calculator is required and used extensively. The mathematics department recommends that the prerequisite not be more than two years old. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the recommendation is that the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.