Sport Management – Associate in Arts

The Jackson College Sport Management program prepares students for careers in the global sport industry. The associate degree curriculum explores the cultural and business impact of sport through hands-on, real-word case studies and internships. This program develops strong skills in critical business areas of sport including management, communication, marketing, accounting, leadership, entrepreneurship, and human resource management.

Upon graduation with an Associate in Art in Sport Management from Jackson College, many of our graduates will transfer to a four-year bachelor’s degree granting university to pursue a degree in sport management, business, law, accounting, urban planning, and graduate studies.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 60
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 15

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose two of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

ENG 132 Writing Experience II 3 ENG 131

This is an intensive writing course. Analytical and persuasive modes are stressed. Advanced research writing strategies are used. Database and primary research methods are emphasized. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

ENG 232 Technical & Business Writing 3 ENG 131

A course designed to provide practice in a variety of written and oral communications to meet the requirements of the workplace. Projects may include descriptions, instructions, résumés, proposals, reports or online documents. It involves frequent writing, both in and out of class, as well as oral presentations, collaborative activities and individual conferences.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
COM 231 Communication Fundamentals 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Students will learn the basic principles of speech communication including speech development and delivery, interpersonal message, non-verbal messages, and small group dynamics. The course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in a diverse global society. Student speeches will be evaluated for effectiveness.

COM 240 Interpersonal Communication 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

(FORMERLY SPH 240) Students will learn to improve communication in one-on-one and small group situations. In this course, students will examine basic verbal and non-verbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group and work contexts. Specific units of discussion include intrapersonal perspective, conflict resolution, self-disclosure, message generation, intercultural messages and non-verbal communication.

COM 260 Small Group Communication 3

In this course, students will examine small group communication theories and processes by observing and participating in group activities. As group members, students will apply communication theory to enhance their effectiveness as members and leaders

Prerequisite: COM 231 or COM 240

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines; at least one course must be a laboratory science course:

 

Non-laboratory science courses:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 140 Public Health and Disease 3 ENG 085* ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

This lecture/discussion course provides an evidence-based approach to the concepts of public health. Topics covered include infectious and non-infectious diseases along with genetic and environmental factors in health and disease. Students will explore local and national public health resources with an emphasis on how public health data can be used to inform decisions about their own health.

GEO 131 Physical Geography 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The course begins with maps and grid systems. Map exercises are used all semester to enhance the textbook. Other topics include meteorology, vegetation, earth materials and a range of tectonic and landscape subjects.

Lab science courses:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 132 Human Biology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Students focus on the structure and function of the human body, the unity and diversity of life, the nature of scientific inquiry, and the principles and processes of evolution as well as contemporary issues that relate to biology. Course includes a laboratory component which focuses on human anatomy.

GEL 109 Earth Science 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090* and MAT 033* or higher

This course serves as a foundation for the Earth sciences and Earth science majors. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experience and class discussions to reinforce scientific principles. Earth science case studies are covered in detail. In laboratory, the students will learn how to apply basic scientific principles through active learning and application. This course has a laboratory component.

NSC 131 Contemporary Science 4 ENG 090* and MAT 020* or higher

An interdisciplinary course that introduces the nature of science as a process. Particular topics from biology, chemistry, physics, geology and astronomy covered with an emphasis on critical thinking and evaluating evidence to examine competing theories. This course is ideal as a first science course for students whose science background is minimal, who are anxious about science, or who have not had a science course for several years. Course includes a laboratory component.

PHY 131 Conceptual Physics 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Become familiar with basic concepts used in physics to describe and explain various physical phenomena. The course covers the following topics: kinematics (the description of motion); mechanics (the study of force, momentum and energy); the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; temperature and heat; waves and sound; electricity and magnetism; and optics. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the basics of physics using a minimum of mathematics. Course includes a laboratory component.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
HIS 131 Western Civilization to 1555 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course examines the roots of Western culture and its development through the Reformation. The course also surveys the social, philosophical, scientific, artistic, religious and political setting evolution with emphasis on the role of ideas and their consequences in the history of the human kind from the beginning to the 16th century.

HIS 132 Western Civilization 1555 to Present 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

HIS 131, together with HIS 132, constitutes the basic history course, as well as an introduction to the humanities. This course is a continuation of HIS 131, emphasizing the development of new political areas, economic and social theories, the evolution and expansion of modern states, and efforts to control international tensions from the 16th century to the present.

PLS 141 American National Government 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

Develops a systematic framework for the interpretation of political activity in the United States. Numerous models explain the theoretical foundations of government and the decision-making process.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SOC 231 Principles of Sociology 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

The discipline and its contributions to understanding the fundamental processes of social interaction. Includes development of self, socialization process, groups and social structure. Application of sociological principles to our society by examination of relevant research.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose two of the following from two different disciplines:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ANT 131 Cultural Anthropology 3 ENG 085*

Cultural anthropology is a one semester introductory course. The course focuses on the thesis that every society is based on an integrated culture, which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

COM 250 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

(Students cannot receive credit for both COM 250 and COM 350) This course will explore how diverse cultural orientations influence the way we perceive and interact with an increasingly culturally diverse world. We will discuss the causes of intercultural conflicts in different communication settings (interpersonal, small group, school, workplace and global) and how to manage them effectively.

PHL 243 Great World Religions 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students examine the literature and historical settings of great world religions. The relationship of contemporary thought is considered for representative groups.

PLS 262 International Relations 3 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Survey contemporary world affairs and examine the nation-state system, the struggle for power, and factors creating harmony and hostility among states.

SPN 131 Elementary Spanish I 4 ENG 085, ENG 091

Introduces and develops the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with special emphasis on listening and speaking.

SPN 132 Elementary Spanish II 4 SPN 131

Provides increased practice in the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

WRL 104 Mandarin I 2

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BUA 250 Business Law I 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

This course offers an introduction to law and the legal system, dispute resolution and courts, business ethics, torts, contracts, sales and leases of goods, and negotiable instruments.

SMT 100 Introduction to Sports Management 3

Students will explore careers in the sport industry, both in the U.S. and globally, inclusive of professional, collegiate, youth, and non-profit sport, as well global branding, sponsorships, merchandising and entertainment events. Using the sports industry perspective, many business principles will be covered, such as: marketing, strategic management, communication, sales and revenue generation, facility management and finance.

SMT 111 Historical and Sociological Issues in Sport 3

This course is designed for students to examine and understand the ways in which sport and physical activity are affected by historical and social forces, and in turn, how sport and physical activity influence society.  This course also examines the sociological factors that influence sport in our society.  The purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical basis and the ability to critically examine the sociological issues found within sport.

SMT 230 Principles of Sports Marketing 3

Students analyze the sport marketplace and consumption trends to identify customer wants and needs and develop effective marketing strategies to satisfy them. Emphasis is placed on evaluating sport/entertainment environments, identifying target markets, building brands, and the marketing functions of product or service planning, pricing, promotion and placement (distribution).

SMT 240 Sport Facility and Event Management 3

This course examines the principles of facility operations and event management in the industry of sport management.  This course provides students with an in-depth investigation of the unique challenges and opportunities that are routinely faced by a business, facility or event manager in the context of events at sport and entertainment venues.  This course offers an introduction to the planning, marketing, management, and evaluation of sporting and entertainment venues.  This course offers an introduction to the planning, marketing, management, and evaluation of sporting and other entertainment venues.  This course gives students an overview of the three major components of facility management: event management, risk management, and facility management.

ELECTIVES

Choose three of the following:

 

Recommended for General Sport Management Focus:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ACC 231 Principles of Accounting I 4 ENG 085*, ENG 090*, MAT 033* or higher and CIS 101 or CIS 121 $787.20

This course is an introductory course in Financial Accounting. Learn the theory and practice of recording financial accounting data and preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) with an emphasis on corporations. Current software and online applications will be utilized.

BUA 231 Advertising, Promotion & Public Relations 3 CIS 095*, ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Students study the principles and practices of numerous promotional tools used in marketing communications. Topics include creation of advertising, media strategies, message appeals, plus the use of specialty advertising, sales promotion and public relations to help sell goods, services and ideas.

CIS 158 Programming Logic 3 CIS 095*

Students explore the development of the logic and theory for writing business programs that control the operation of a computer. Course covers the development of both structured design and object-oriented design. Topics include control structures, arrays, data validation, testing and debugging.

CNS 251 Cloud Computing 3 CNS 101

This course covers the widest spectrum of topics starting from Classic Data Center to IT-as-a-Service. It provides a strong foundation for the understanding of virtualization and cloud computing technologies. You will learn about the transition from classic data center to virtualized data center to cloud computing. This would encompass virtualization technologies at computer, storage, network, desktop, and application level as well as cloud building blocks, which are created on virtualized infrastructure. The course emphasizes deployment models, business continuity solutions, infrastructure, service management and security in a cloud environment.

COM 260 Small Group Communication 3

In this course, students will examine small group communication theories and processes by observing and participating in group activities. As group members, students will apply communication theory to enhance their effectiveness as members and leaders

Prerequisite: COM 231 or COM 240

HPF 173 Sports Matters 3

Students examine the changes and challenges in the field of sport and exercise today for the individual and society, including ethics and values, gender, ethnicity, leadership and politics.

Recommended for Esports focus:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
SMT 110 Esport in Society 3

This course is designed to explore the sociological factors that influence esport in our society. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the basis and ability to examine sociological issues found within esport. Key areas that will be examined in this course are health and wellness, global issues, youth and teen experiences, and race, religion, and gender equity in esport.

SMT 210 Introduction to Esport Management 3

This course is designed to explore the various areas of the esport business industry. The course will examine the following areas in esport: business competencies, event management, league operations, fan engagement, coaching, team management, content creation and video production, sponsorship, and broadcasting and streaming.  Other areas that will be examined in this course are health promotion and preventative care for esport gamers, influence of media on esport, and the history of esport.  This course will introduce students to career opportunities and business concepts required to manage esport organizations and operations.  The industry structure and challenges will also be discussed.

SMT 245 Internship 3

Students plan, organize, direct, and assess a public activity which integrates the learning objectives of the sports management degree. Students will have meaningful internship experience with an appropriate company. The company and job must be approved by the supervising faculty member.