Select Language

Allied Health

Frequently Asked Questions

Choose the section related to your question:

 

Back to Top

General Information

Application Due Dates

Back to Top

Diagnostic Medical Sonography

Jackson College has compiled this information to assist you as you are preparing for the Diagnostic Medical Sonography Programs in either: General Sonography; Vascular Sonography; or Cardiac Sonography.

Who is a Sonographer?

  • A professional who works directly with patients in performing Sonographic diagnostic procedures.
  • A professional who performs diagnostic procedures/tests (tests that are non-invasive, without puncturing or performing incisions on a patient).
  • A professional who provides physicians with medical diagnostic information on the structure and function of the area of the body in question.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


What is the nature of their work, what do they do?

Sonographers are medical professional who operate ultrasonic imaging devices to produce diagnostic images and scans, videos, or 3D volumes of anatomy and diagnostic data. Sonography requires specialized education and skills to view, analyze and modify the scan to optimize the information in the image. Because of the high levels of decisional latitude and diagnostic responsibility sonographers Perform diagnostic tests such as ultrasounds, and imaging.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


Where do they work? Where are job opportunities available?

  • Many opportunities are available throughout the United States for experienced and qualified individuals.
  • Clinics, mobile health services, physician's offices, and hospitals have open positions.
  • Medical industry companies also offer work in research and development, sales and marketing, which provide opportunities for international travel.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


What could I make in this line of work?

General sonographers usually make in the range of $43,453-$53,712 per year depending on geographic location, according to "www.hotjobs.yahoo.com.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


Is Sonography right for me?

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Do you like science?
  • Do you like math?
  • Do you like to figure things out on your own?
  • Do you like to work independently?
  • Do you like to interact with other people?
  • Do you like to use technology?
  • Do you like to be challenged with new ideas?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, then maybe Sonography is right for you!

[ Return to DMS Top ]


How would I learn this? What methods are used to teach students?

  • Accredited schools that offer Associate or Bachelor Degrees require you to participate in lecture, lab, clinical and didactic settings.
  • Normal course work includes a minimum of one year of didactic lectures and class work, followed by an internship in the different diagnostic procedure settings.
  • Be careful choosing your school. CAAHEP accredited programs may be required for certification. Jackson College Sonography programs are accredited and listed on CAAHEP. For more information, go to www.caahep.org or the website for ARDMS at www.ardms.org.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


I am interested in your Diagnostic Medical Sonography Distance Learning/online program. Can I complete the program from home?

No, this program still requires the student to complete the clinical requirements in a clinical setting with real patients. The only courses offered online are the didactic courses which allows a student to have a clinical setting close to them and finish the course work online rather than commuting to Jackson College.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


How many hours a week must I attend clinical?

Each Sonography program is different. You can expect to be in the clinical setting 24-32 hours a week for nearly a year.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


Can go to clinical at night or on weekends?

Not typically. Accreditation requires students to be placed in the best learning situations. This is typically Monday through Friday 8 am to 5 pm when the majority of the staff and patients are scheduled. Students may also be expected to rotate to other shifts for different experiences.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


Can I work while going through this program?

While we cannot control what you do in your own time, we strongly recommend that you do not try to work while going through the program. Some of our programs require a minimum 40 hours per week commitment, which does not account for studying time or commuting time to and from clinical assignments. It is estimated that an average of 50-60 hours of dedication is need to be successful in these programs. Adding work requirements in addition to these 50-60 hours has typically caused poor outcomes. The programs are a full time commitment. Currently, there are no part-time options.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


How much does the DMS program cost?

The cost of the program depends on which program you choose, where you live and how many credits, if any, you transfer to Jackson College. You will first need to know which program you are interested in.

The Cardiac Sonography program requires a minimum of 69 credits.

The General Sonography program requires a minimum of 77 credits.

The Vascular Sonography program requires a minimum of 73 credits.

Tuition & Fees

Tuition and fees are subject to change by the Board of Trustees. Total costs are determined by tuition based on the number of billing contact hours, the Student fee, and any course fees. Tuition rates and fees can be calculated by following the Tuition Worksheet.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


How does the admission process for the DMS programs work?

The admissions process is based on a point system awarding points to grade(s) in courses such as Anatomy and Physiology, Medical Terminology, Introduction to Sonographic instrumentation, etc… Also, students that have a health background will be given points toward the selective admission process. The entire admission process and point system is outlined on the application process, which can be found here:

  • Cardiac Sonography, General Sonography, Vascular Sonography
  • There is no waiting list for these programs. You must reapply each year if you are not accepted into the program after your first application.
  • High grades, related Allied Health experience, and job shadowing experiences positively influences your chances to secure a spot in the program. NOTE: Jackson College does not assist in finding job shadowing opportunities.
  • There are approximately 25 seats available annually within each program; however, the actual number of students accepted into the Sonography programs is determined by how many clinical sites are available to host Jackson College students. Most clinical sites are a 1:1 student to clinical site ratio.
  • Students may be required to complete a criminal background check and drug screen. Failure to pass may prevent admission into a Sonography program. Some convictions may result in the student being ineligible to sit for the ARDMS exam. It is the student’s responsibility to verify eligibility directly with ARDMS.
  • Participation of clinical sites varies each year. While Jackson College uses its best efforts to negotiate clinical sites, even after they become available they can become unavailable for reasons beyond the control of JC and in that event Jackson College has no liability. The Allied Health Office makes every attempt to secure and assign students to clinical sites based on the student’s preferences regarding commuting and/or relocation. However, it is not always possible to secure a site within commuting distance therefore students who are open to relocating improve their chances of getting into the program You are encouraged to view the clinical site information on Jackson College’s website or contact the Allied Health Office regarding clinical site questions.
  • If there are approved accredited Sonography programs currently in your area it may be challenging for Jackson College to secure a clinical site in this area. A listing of accredited Sonography programs can be viewed on the CAAHEP website at www.caahep.org.
  • If you have a hospital or ultrasound lab who is interested in hosting you as a student for one of Jackson College’s Sonography Programs.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


Can I apply for one of the DMS programs if I am currently taking pre-requisites necessary for admission the semester my application is due?

If you are enrolled in a course that is used for determining points on the admission process you can still apply, but if the courses are not completed by the application deadline you will not receive any points for that course. The Jackson College Sonography Programs will no longer accept midterm grades in the admission process. It is recommended that you have all of the courses used in the admission process to assess points completed before the application deadline to receive the most points.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


What are the benefits in completing a job shadowing in the field of Sonography?

Job shadowing gives the candidate an opportunity to see if the medical field is a good fit for them, and this is something that student wants to devote their time and education toward this field. Sometimes when a student volunteers or job shadows they see firsthand what the hospital environment is like before investing in the field of DMS.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


How do I know if courses taken at other colleges will transfer to Jackson College to fulfill prerequisite requirements?

Your official college transcripts must be mailed directly from each of your prior universities to the Registrar’s office at: Jackson College 2111 Emmons Rd Jackson, MI 49201.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


I am from another state or city that Jackson College does not hold a current clinical site, can I still apply to your program?

Yes, but we recommend that if you live within a 2 hour driving radius of another CAAHEP accredited program, you should apply to that program. Obtaining a clinical site for you to perform your clinical may be challenging, if not impossible, if you live close to another sonography school. To get a better idea of the likelihood of us getting a hospital in your area, please find accredited programs near you at www.caahep.org.

If you do not live near another ultrasound program and there is not a clinical site listed on Jackson College's web page near where you live, and if you feel that there is a large enough hospital near you that could host you for a year to complete your clinical requirements, you will need to contact that facility and ask if they interested in hosting an ultrasound student.

If you have a hospital or ultrasound lab who is interested in hosting you as a student for one of Jackson College’s Sonography Programs you will need to:

  1. Ask the Supervisor or Manager of the ultrasound lab to complete these two forms and submit them back to the Allied Health Office via mail or fax 517.768.7004:
  2. Once the Characteristics of Clinical Education Center and the Summary Curriculum Vitae Form are filled out and received by the Allied Health Office, they will be reviewed to determine if this facility meets the standards for the Jackson College’s accredited sonography program. If the standards are met then:
    • Jackson College will contact the Supervisor or Manager of the ultrasound lab to learn if they are willing to commit to hosting a Jackson College student for a sonography program.
    • This facility will be asked to enter into an Education Agreement with Jackson College. (This process is handled by the Allied Health Office and Jackson College’s Legal Affairs Office).
  3. For more information about Jackson College's sonography programs and to learn about the Clinical Site's responsibilities review the Clinical Site Fact Sheet.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


What makes Jackson College different from other programs?

Jackson College is one of the longest CAAHEP accredited programs in the United States. Jackson College offers the DMS programs in a distance learning, online format while physics is taught both face to face and online to serve different students’ learning styles. JC offered the first CAAHEP accredited DMS program in the U.S.

[ Return to DMS Top ]


What does accredited program mean to a DMS graduate?

Any student (other than a Bachelor degree or RT(R) who graduates from a “non accredited” DMS program must work or volunteer for an additional year before they are eligible to take the national registry boards (ARDMS or www.ardms.org.) The board results since 1975 range between 50-79% for abdomen, physics, and obstetrics/gynecology so waiting 12 months to become eligible for the boards may not be of benefit for the graduate, especially in the area of physics. Also, some hospitals will only hire a sonography graduate from a CAAHEP accredited program—see www.ardms.org or www.sdms.org.

Back to Top

EKG Technician

If I were to complete the EKG Technician Skill Set, would I be eligible to become certified?

The EKG Technician skill set prepares you to sit for the national Certified Cardiovascular Technologist (CCT) credentialing exam through Cardiovascular Credentialing International (CCI). Certified Cardiographic Technicians are professionals working in the areas of EKG, Holter monitoring and Stress testing. For more information about Cardiovascular Credentialing International and the credentialing examinations that the not-for-profit corporation provides please visit cci-online.org.

[ Return to EKG Top ]


What are the qualification requirements to take the CCT Specialty Exam?

  1. Must have a high school diploma or general education diploma at the time of application.
  2. Must be currently enrolled as a student or a graduate of a cardiovascular or allied health training program.
  3. Must provide typed documentation to support your enrollment or completion of your training program.

[ Return to EKG Top ]


What kinds of questions will be on the Specialty Exam to become a Certified Cardiographic Technician?

After taking the courses to complete the EKG Technician Skill set you will be prepared to take the Special Exam for CCT. The exam will test you on your knowledge in the following categories:

  • Basic Cardiovascular anatomy & Physiology
  • ECG Techniques & Recognition
  • Basic Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
  • Stress Test Techniques, Indications and Contraindications
  • Ambulatory Monitoring (i.e. holter)
  • Cardiac Medications

[ Return to EKG Top ]


Where are the test sites for the certified examinations?

The examinations offered by Cardiovascular Credentialing International (CCI) are administered by Pearson Professional Centers, which as over 3200 sites worldwide. A complete list of Pearson test sites can be found at www.pearsonvue.com/cci.

Back to Top

Emergency Medical Services

What could I make in this line of work?

Earnings of EMTs and paramedics depend on the employment setting and geographic location of their jobs, as well as their training and experience. Median hourly wages of EMTs and paramedics were $14.10 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $11.13 and $18.28. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $9.08, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $23.77. Median hourly wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of EMTs and paramedics in May 2008 were $12.99 in other ambulatory healthcare services and $15.45 in local government.

In 2008, about 27 percent of EMTs and paramedics belonged to a union or were covered by a union contract.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

[ Return to EMS Top ]


Where do they work? Where are job opportunities?

EMTs and paramedics held about 210,700 jobs in 2008. Most career EMTs and paramedics work in metropolitan areas. Volunteer EMTs and paramedics are more common in small cities, towns, and rural areas. These individuals volunteer for fire departments, emergency medical services, or hospitals and may respond to only a few calls per month.

Paid EMTs and paramedics were employed in a number of industries. About 45 percent worked as employees of ambulance services. About 29 percent worked in local government. Another 20 percent worked in hospitals.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

[ Return to EMS Top ]


What is the Job Outlook?

Employment for EMTs and paramedics is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2018. Job prospects should be good, particularly in cities and private ambulance services.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

[ Return to EMS Top ]


What is the nature of work, what do they do?

People's lives often depend on the quick reaction and competent care of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics. Incidents as varied as automobile accidents, heart attacks, slips and falls, childbirth, and gunshot wounds require immediate medical attention. EMTs and paramedics provide this vital service as they care for and transport the sick or injured to a medical facility.

In an emergency, EMTs and paramedics are typically dispatched by a 911 operator to the scene, where they often work with police and fire fighters. (Police and fire fighters are discussed elsewhere in the Handbook.) Once they arrive, EMTs and paramedics assess the nature of the patient's condition, while trying to determine whether the patient has any pre-existing medical conditions. Following protocols and guidelines, they provide emergency care and transport the patient to a medical facility. EMTs and paramedics operate in emergency medical services systems where a physician provides medical direction and oversight.

EMTs and paramedics use special equipment, such as backboards, to immobilize patients before placing them on stretchers and securing them in the ambulance for transport to a medical facility. These workers generally work in teams. During the transport of a patient, one EMT or paramedic drives, while the other monitors the patient's vital signs and gives additional care, as needed. Some paramedics work as part of a helicopter's flight crew to quickly transport critically ill or injured patients to hospital trauma centers. At the medical facility, EMTs and paramedics help transfer patients to the emergency department, report their observations and actions to emergency department staff, and may provide additional emergency treatment. After each run, EMTs and paramedics document the trip, replace used supplies and check equipment. If a transported patient has a contagious disease, EMTs and paramedics decontaminate the interior of the ambulance and report cases to the proper authorities. EMTs and paramedics also provide transportation for patients from one medical facility to another, particularly if they work for private ambulance services. Patients often need to be transferred to a hospital that specializes in treating their injury or illness or to facility that provides long-term care, like nursing homes.

Beyond these general duties, the specific responsibilities of EMTs and paramedics depend on their level of qualification and training. The National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) certifies emergency medical service providers at five levels: First Responder; EMT-Basic; EMT-Intermediate (which has two levels called 1985 and 1999) and Paramedic. Some States, however, have their own certification programs and use distinct names and titles.

The EMT-Basic represents the first response of the emergency medical system. An EMT trained at this level is prepared to care for patients at the scene of an accident and while transporting patients by ambulance to the hospital under the direction of more highly trained medical personnel. The EMT-Basic has the emergency skills to assess a patient's condition and manage respiratory, cardiac, and trauma emergencies.

The EMT-Intermediate has more advanced training. However, the specific tasks that those certified at this level are allowed to perform varies greatly from State to State. Paramedics provide more extensive pre-hospital care than do EMTs. In addition to carrying out the procedures of the other levels, paramedics administer medications orally and intravenously, interpret electrocardiograms (EKGs), perform endotracheal intubations, and use monitors and other complex equipment. However, like the EMT-Intermediate level, what paramedics are permitted to do varies by State.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

[ Return to EMS Top ]


What are the pre-requisites for the EMS Program?

  • The pre-requisites for the Basic EMT Program are to complete ENG 131 or higher and MTH 120 or higher. It is suggested to take EMS 112 with the EMS 120 course.
  • The pre-requisites for the Intermediate EMT program are to complete EMS 120 or provide an EMT-Basic License
  • The pre-requisites for the Paramedic EMT program are to complete MOA 120, BIO 155 or BIO 253 & BIO 254 and provide an EMT-B License or an EMT-I License.

[ Return to EMS Top ]


How long is the Program?

  • EMS 120 (Basic): 1 semester
  • EMS 150 (Intermediate): 1 semester
  • EMS 215, 225, 235, & 245 (Paramedic): 4 semesters

[ Return to EMS Top ]


When does enrollment take place?

  • Basic: Fall and Winter
  • Intermediate: Fall and Winter
  • Paramedic: Fall

[ Return to EMS Top ]


Does Jackson College offer additional training or Continuing Education?

Yes, Jackson College offers additional training for ACLS, PALS, BLS, and refresher courses

[ Return to EMS Top ]

Back to Top

Medical Assistant

 

Back to Top

Radiography

When does enrollment for the Radiography Program take place?

Applications are due by January 31st each year. Program interviews are in March, accepted students will be notified in April, and would begin the Radiography program in May.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


What are the pre-requisites for the program?

Students must have completed all prerequisite course work with a final grade of 3.0 or better in each course.

  • DMS 100 – Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging
  • BIO 132 – Human Biology and/or BIO 253/254 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II
  • MOA 120 – Medical Terminology
  • HOC 130 – Introduction to Health Occupations

[ Return to RAD Top ]


I understand that the acceptance is based on a point system. What are the criteria to earn points?

  • GPA
  • Previous Allied Health Experience
  • Grades received in pre-requisite classes
  • Job Shadow Experience
  • Previous degrees earned (Associate, Bachelor, or Masters)
  • Interview Scores

[ Return to RAD Top ]


How long is the Program?

After completion of the pre-requisites, the program is a two year program. This includes 1,672 hours of Clinical Practicum.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


What is the admission process for entrance into the Radiography Program?

The first step is to submit an application to Jackson College (this can be done on-line). Once accepted, you will want to have official transcripts from other colleges sent to Jackson College for evaluation. You are encouraged to contact a Jackson College Advisor Kim Seaburg, who will assess what prerequisites courses you will need. Applications for the Radiography program must be turned in before January 31, along with a $50.00 application fee. (Keep in mind that all of your pre-requisites must be completed or in process before you can submit your application!) Once applications are received and evaluated, qualified students will be sent a questionnaire. After the questionnaire is completed and returned, applicants are evaluated once again to determine if they qualify for an interview. Interviews take place in March, and qualified applicants are offered acceptance in the program in April. The Radiography program begins in May and runs for __ Months.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


If I were to complete the Radiography Program, would I be eligible to become registered?

YES! Completion of the Radiography Program at Jackson College would prepare you to sit for the ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) board exam, which, if passed, would render you a RT (R). (Registered Technologist, Radiography)

[ Return to RAD Top ]


Would I be allowed to work while I am in the program?

Most students work part-time while in the radiography program. The program does require approximately four (4) days per week of a student’s time on average, which makes it impossible to work full-time and be in the program.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


Who is a Radiographer?

  • A professional who works directly with patients in performing radiographic diagnostic procedures.
  • A professional who performs diagnostic procedures/tests (tests that are non-invasive, without puncturing or performing incisions on a patient).
  • A professional who provides physicians with medical diagnostic information on the structure and function of the area of the body in question.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


What is the nature of their work, what do they do?

  • Perform diagnostic tests using x-rays.
  • Work with sophisticated, manually operated equipment outside of a patient's body to discover what is happening inside their body.
  • Radiographers can go on to perform specialized imaging procedures such as CT, MRI, and Mammography.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


Where do they work? Where are job opportunities available?

  • Many opportunities are available throughout the United States for experienced and qualified individuals.
  • Clinics, mobile health services, physician's offices, and hospitals have open positions.
  • Medical industry companies also offer work in research and development, sales and marketing, which provide opportunities for international travel.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


What is the basic curriculum for a degree in Radiography?

  • A college level diploma in the applied science field.
  • On year pre-requisites with curriculum focus in anatomy, physiology, and math.
  • Advanced courses on specific methods of diagnostic procedures, and disease entities.

[ Return to RAD Top ]


How would I learn this? What methods are used to teach students?

  • Accredited schools that offer Associate or Bachelor Degrees require you to participate in lecture, lab, clinical and didactic settings.
  • The program involves two years of clinical and didactic training.
  • The Radiography program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).
    Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology
    20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850
    Chicago, IL 60606-3182
    312.704.5300 • Fax: 312.704.5304, www.jrcert.org

[ Return to RAD Top ]


What could I make in this line of work?

  • The median salary for a Radiographer in the U.S. in 2004 was $50,000-$80,000 (depending on geographic location).

[ Return to RAD Top ]


How is the Radiography program delivered?

The Radiography program is a face-to-face program delivered on the Jackson Campus of Jackson College.

[ Return to RAD Top ]

Back to Top

Respiratory Care

Who are Respiratory Care Practitioners?

  • Respiratory care practitioners (also known as respiratory therapists) are considered the go-to experts in their facilities for respiratory care technology. But their high tech knowledge isn't just limited to the equipment they use in their jobs. They also understand how to apply high tech devices in the care and treatment of patients, how to assess patients to ensure the treatments are working properly, and how to make the care changes necessary to arrive at the best outcome for the patient.
  • The combination of these skills-hands on technical know-how and a solid understanding of respiratory conditions and how they are treated-is what sets respiratory therapists apart from the crowd and makes them such a crucial part of the health care team.
  • Source: AARC (American Association for Respiratory Care) website.

[ Return to RES Top ]


What is the nature of their work/what do they do?

  • Diagnosing lung and breathing disorders and recommending treatment methods.
  • Interviewing patients and doing chest physical exams to determine what kind of therapy is best for their condition.
  • Consulting with physicians to recommend a change in therapy, based on your evaluation of the patient.
  • Analyzing breath, tissue, and blood specimens to determine levels of oxygen and other gases.
  • Managing ventilators and artificial airway devices for patients who can't breathe normally on their own.
  • Responding to Code Blue or other urgent calls for care.
  • Educating patients and families about lung disease so they can maximize their recovery.
  • Source: AARC website.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Where do they work? Where are job opportunities available?

  • In hospitals giving breathing treatments to people with asthma and other respiratory conditions.
  • In intensive care units managing ventilators that keep the critically ill alive.
  • In emergency rooms delivering life-saving treatments.
  • In newborn and pediatric units helping kids with conditions ranging from premature birth to cystic fibrosis.
  • In operating rooms working with anesthesiologists to monitor patients' breathing during surgery.
  • In patient's homes providing regular check-ups and making sure people have what they need to stay out of the hospital.
  • In sleep laboratories helping to diagnose disorders like sleep apnea.
  • In skilled nursing facilities and pulmonary rehabilitation programs helping older people breathe easier and get more out of life.
  • In doctor's offices conducting pulmonary function tests and providing patient education.
  • In asthma education programs helping kids and adults alike learn how to cope with the condition.
  • In smoking cessation programs assisting those who want to kick the habit for good.
  • In air transport and ambulance programs rushing to rescue people in need of immediate medical attention.
  • In case management programs helping devise long-term care plans for patients.
  • Source: AARC website.
  • Respiratory therapists held about 105,900 jobs in 2008. About 81 percent of jobs were in hospitals, mainly in departments of respiratory care, anesthesiology, or pulmonary medicine.
  • Most of the remaining jobs were in offices of physicians or other health practitioners, consumer-goods rental firms that supply respiratory equipment for home use, nursing care facilities, employment services, and home healthcare services.
  • Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

[ Return to RES Top ]


What could I make in this line of work?

  • Median annual wages of wage-and-salary respiratory therapists were $52,200 in May 2008.
  • The middle 50 percent earned between $44,490 and $61,720.
  • The lowest 10 percent earned less than $37,920 and the highest 10 percent earned more than $69,800.
  • Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

[ Return to RES Top ]


What is the Job Outlook?

  • Much faster than average growth is projected for respiratory therapists. Job opportunities should be very good.
  • Employment change. Employment of respiratory therapists is expected to grow by 21 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. The increasing demand will come from substantial growth in the middle-aged and elderly population—a development that will heighten the incidence of cardiopulmonary disease. Growth in demand also will result from the expanding role of respiratory therapists in case management, disease prevention, emergency care, and the early detection of pulmonary disorders.
  • Older Americans suffer most from respiratory ailments and cardiopulmonary diseases, such as pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and heart disease. As the number of older persons increases, the need for respiratory therapists is expected to increase as well. In addition, advances in inhalable medications and in the treatment of lung transplant patients, heart attack and accident victims, and premature infants—many of whom depend on a ventilator during part of their treatment—will increase the demand for the services of respiratory care practitioners.
  • Job prospects. Job opportunities are expected to be very good, especially for those with a bachelor's degree and certification, and those with cardiopulmonary care skills or experience working with infants. The vast majority of job openings will continue to be in hospitals. However, a growing number of openings are expected to be outside of hospitals, especially in home healthcare services, offices of physicians or other health practitioners, consumer-goods rental firms, or in the employment services industry as a temporary worker in various settings.
  • Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

[ Return to RES Top ]


Is Respiratory Care right for me?

Check out the AARC's information on what it means to Be an RT in order to find out!

[ Return to RES Top ]


What are the pre-requisites for the program?

The prerequisites are now split into two categories, to reflect the importance of science and math in preparing you for the program. First, there are the two in which you are required to earn a 3.0 to be considered. They are:

  1. BIO 132 (Human Biology) OR BIO 155 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) OR BIO 253 and BIO 254 (Human Anatomy and Physiology)
  2. MAT 131 (Intermediate Algebra)

Then, there are the two in which you are required to earn a 2.0 to be considered. They are:

  1. ENG 131 (Writing Experience)
  2. MOA 120 (Medical Terminology)

There has been another change in the required prerequisites. HOC 130 (Introduction to Health Occupations) is no longer required. It is strongly recommended that you take it if you have no health care background. And it will count for a point in the application process.

There are two other classes that will count for extra points in the application process. They are:

  1. CEM 131 (Fundamentals of Chemistry), which is a graduation requirement.
  2. BIO 220 (Microbiology), which is not a required class within the program, although it is strongly recommended.

[ Return to RES Top ]


How are decisions made about who is accepted to the program?

Decisions are made strictly on the point system, which is spelled out within the application.

[ Return to RES Top ]


I understand that the acceptance is based on a point system. What are the criteria to earn points?

  • Previous degrees earned (Associate, Bachelor, or Masters)
  • Previous Allied Health Experience
  • Grades received in pre-requisite classes
  • Information Session

[ Return to RES Top ]


How does the admission process for the program work?

The first step is to submit an application to Jackson College (this can be done on-line). Once accepted, you will want to have official transcripts from other colleges sent to Jackson College for evaluation. You are encouraged to contact Jackson College Advisor Kim Seaburg (e-mail SeaburgKimberlG@jccmi.edu or call 517.796.8452), who will assess what prerequisites courses you will need. Applications for the Respiratory Care program must be turned in by August 31, along with the application fee. (Keep in mind that all of your pre-requisites must be completed or in process before you can submit your application!) Once applications are received and evaluated, qualified applicants are offered acceptance in the program in December. The program begins in January and runs two years.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Do I need to complete ALL of the prerequisites before my application will be considered? Do I REALLY need to earn a 3.0 in BIO and MAT before my application will be considered?

Yes. Your application will not even be considered unless you complete BIO and MAT with a 3.0.

[ Return to RES Top ]


When will I be notified if I have been accepted to the program?

Because some applicants will be enrolled in prerequisites they will not complete until December, then all applicants must wait to be notified until the grades for Fall term are submitted in December.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Can I apply for the program if I am currently taking pre-requisites necessary for admission the semester my application is due?

If you are enrolled in courses that is used for determining points in the admission process you can still apply, but you will need to complete the courses with the required grades before you can be considered for acceptance.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Should I do job shadowing in the field of Respiratory Care? Is job shadowing the same as the Hospital Tour on the application?

  • Job shadowing gives the candidate an opportunity to see if the medical field is a good fit for them, and if the field is one toward which the student wants to devote time and education. The student can job shadow as much as needed to learn whether Respiratory Care is a good "fit."It is worth no points in the application process.
  • The Hospital Tour is a brief, formal presentation, and although it is worth a point in the application process, it is no substitute for job shadowing on your own.
  • If you need help making contacts for job shadowing, please contact the Respiratory Care Program Director Ann Flint at 517.796.8684 or flintannm@jccmi.edu.

[ Return to RES Top ]


How do I know if courses taken at other colleges will transfer to Jackson College to fulfill prerequisite requirements?

Your official college transcripts must be mailed directly from each of your prior colleges/universities to the Registrar's office at: Jackson College, 2111 Emmons Rd., Jackson, MI 49201. They will then be evaluated for transfer. You are encouraged to contact Jackson College Advisor Kim Seaburg (e-mail SeaburgKimberlG@jccmi.edu or call 517.796.8452), who will assess what prerequisites courses you will need.

[ Return to RES Top ]


When does enrollment take place?

Applications are due by August 31st each year. Accepted students will be notified in December and would begin the program in January.

[ Return to RES Top ]


How would I learn this? What methods are used to teach students?

  • Accredited schools require you to participate in lecture, lab, clinical and didactic settings.
  • Normal course work includes two years of didactic lectures, class work and labs. Each lab course is followed by an internship in the related clinical setting(s).

[ Return to RES Top ]


What is the basic curriculum for a degree in Respiratory Care?

  • An associate degree is the minimum educational requirement, but a bachelor's or master's degree may be important for advancement. All states except Alaska require respiratory therapists to be licensed.
  • Education and training. An associate degree is required to become a respiratory therapist. Training is offered at the postsecondary level by colleges and universities, medical schools, vocational-technical institutes, and the Armed Forces. Most programs award associate or bachelor's degrees and prepare graduates for jobs as advanced respiratory therapists. A limited number of associate degree programs lead to jobs as entry-level respiratory therapists. According to the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 31 entry-level and 346 advanced respiratory therapy programs were accredited in the United States in 2008.
  • Among the areas of study in respiratory therapy programs are human anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, chemistry, physics, microbiology, pharmacology, and mathematics. Other courses deal with therapeutic and diagnostic procedures and tests, equipment, patient assessment, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the application of clinical practice guidelines, patient care outside of hospitals, cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation, respiratory health promotion and disease prevention, and medical recordkeeping and reimbursement.
  • High school students interested in applying to respiratory therapy programs should take courses in health, biology, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Respiratory care involves basic mathematical problem solving and an understanding of chemical and physical principles. For example, respiratory care workers must be able to compute dosages of medication and calculate gas concentrations.
  • Licensure and certification. A license is required to practice as a respiratory therapist, except in Alaska. Also, most employers require respiratory therapists to maintain a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification.
  • Licensure is usually based, in large part, on meeting the requirements for certification from the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). The board offers the Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) credential to those who graduate from entry-level or advanced programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC) and who also pass an exam.
  • The board also awards the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) to CRTs who have graduated from advanced programs and pass two separate examinations. Supervisory positions and intensive-care specialties usually require the RRT.
  • Other qualifications. Therapists should be sensitive to a patient's physical and psychological needs. Respiratory care practitioners must pay attention to detail, follow instructions, and work as part of a team. In addition, operating advanced equipment requires proficiency with computers.
  • Advancement. Respiratory therapists advance in clinical practice by moving from general care to the care of critically ill patients who have significant problems in other organ systems, such as the heart or kidneys. Respiratory therapists, especially those with a bachelor's or master's degree, also may advance to supervisory or managerial positions in a respiratory therapy department. Respiratory therapists in home healthcare and equipment rental firms may become branch managers. Some respiratory therapists advance by moving into teaching positions. Some others use the knowledge gained as a respiratory therapist to work in another industry, such as developing, marketing, or selling pharmaceuticals and medical devices.
  • Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Would I be allowed to work while I am in the program?

Most students work part-time while in the program. The program does require approximately four (4) days per week of a student's time on average, which makes it practically impossible to work full-time and be in the program. Adding overly strenuous work requirements has typically caused poor outcomes. The program is a full time commitment.

[ Return to RES Top ]


How much does the program cost?

The Respiratory Care program requires a minimum of 88 credits. You can find the requirements on the Respiratory Care guidesheet.

Tuition & Fees

Tuition and fees are subject to change by the Board of Trustees. Total costs are determined by tuition based on the number of billing contact hours, the Student fee, and any course fees. Tuition rates and fees can be calculated by following the Tuition Worksheet.

[ Return to RES Top ]


How long is the Program?

After completion of the pre-requisites, the program is a two year program.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Is the program accredited?

There is no such thing as a non-accredited respiratory care program. The Jackson College Respiratory Care program is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC).

[ Return to RES Top ]


How many hours a week must I attend clinical?

Most terms clinical is 16 hours/week for the entire term. There is one term where it is only half the term. Most clinical rotations run Tuesdays and Thursdays for 8.5 hours, on the day shift.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Can go to clinical at night or on weekends?

Not typically. Accreditation requires students to be placed in the best learning situations. There are a few very limited afternoon shift and weekend rotations available in some terms. Students may also be expected to rotate to other shifts for different experiences.

[ Return to RES Top ]


Where do I go for my clinical education?

Available hospitals are within an approximate one-hour radius from Jackson. The hospitals include:

  • Allegiance Health
  • Bixby Medical Center
  • CareLink of Jackson
  • Chelsea Community Hospital
  • Herrick Medical Center
  • Hillsdale Community Health Center
  • Ingham Regional Medical Center
  • Oaklawn Hospital
  • Sparrow Health System
  • St. Joseph Mercy Livingston Hospital
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • UM- Mott

You will be required to attend rotations at several of these hospitals in order to acquire a complete and well-rounded clinical education. Different points in the program require different types of experiences, so the number and types of clinical rotations available will vary as well. There will also be rotations in respiratory care subspecialties, such as pulmonary function testing, home care, pulmonary rehabilitation, and many more.

[ Return to RES Top ]


If I were to complete the program, would I be eligible to become registered?

YES! Completion of the Respiratory Care Program at Jackson College would prepare you to sit for the CRT and RRT (National Board for Respiratory Care) board exams. When all three exams are passed, you will be an RRT (Registered Respiratory Therapist).

[ Return to RES Top ]


Will completing the program allow me to acquire a Michigan license?

Yes, you'd be eligible for licensing in any of the 49 states (including Michigan) where licensure is required. In Michigan, in order to become licensed, you'd need to graduate from an accredited program (like this one!), pass the CRT exam, pass a criminal background check, and pay your licensing fee. The requirements vary somewhat from state to state.

[ Return to RES Top ]

Jackson College has published the contents of this web site for information purposes only. The information contained herein reflects the current curricula, policies, tuition and fees, and regulations of the College. However, these are subject to change at any time by action of the Board of Trustees or the administration. The information is generally believed to be accurate but the College disclaims liability for any inadvertent errors or omissions.

Bookmark and Share