Nursing – Associate in Applied Science

The Associate in Applied Science, Nursing (ADN) program consists of integrated lectures, labs and clinicals conducted in approved clinical education affiliates. The program prepares students to demonstrate competency in providing nursing care in a variety of health care settings and for employment in the field of registered nursing. Candidates successfully completing the ADN program are eligible to apply for the licensing examination (NCLEX-RN) required for licensure as a registered professional nurse (RN).

Students must apply for admission to the nursing program, and must do so within the application deadlines. Admission to the nursing program is highly competitive and is not guaranteed. There are special admission requirements to the nursing program, and it is the student’s responsibility to understand the requirements and adhere to them. Students must meet all admission requirements. Admission into the program is based on a competitive point system, a pre-admission standardized exam and completion of prerequisite courses. The selection process is subject to change. You must work with an academic advisor to plan your prerequisite course sequence and to make application to the nursing program. The advisor will explain the point system on the “ADN Selection Process – Worksheet.”

Students are required to take the Kaplan NCLEX-RN Review Program as part of the curriculum in order to graduate. Multiple standardized exams are also required at various points in the program. Most clinical sites are subject to Act 303 of the Public Acts of 2002, amended April 1, 2006, of the State of Michigan which restricts persons with certain criminal convictions from having access to vulnerable populations. Therefore, the agreements that Jackson College has with these organizations require that as a condition of admission, all students will be subject to a fingerprint-based criminal background check, including an FBI check. Exclusions for convictions can range from one year to permanent exclusion. Questions should be directed to the security department.

In addition, all students must pass a drug screen to enter any nursing program, as well as complete immunizations (as required for health care providers), meet technical standards, and complete a physical form. Following graduation, applicants for licensure as a nurse are also asked about criminal convictions and substance abuse, and this can impact the individual’s ability to become licensed.

Prerequisites are:
• ENG 131 Writing Experience I
• MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics
• PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology
• BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I AND BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
• BIO 220 Microbiology

Applications are accepted for fall or winter admission. See a student success navigator for application deadlines. It is highly recommended that chemistry be taken prior to Human Anatomy & Physiology. All sciences and Pharmacology must be taken within the last eight years. Nursing courses MUST be taken in sequence, with the exception of Pharmacology. Students are required to take and pass the HESI RN Admission Assessment (A2) prior to admission.


Program Requirements

Minimum credits 66
Minimum cumulative GPA 2.0
Minimum grade in all courses 2.0
Minimum grade in BIO 253 and BIO 254 3.0
Minimum Jackson College credits 37

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GEO 1: Write clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

GEO 2: Speak clearly, concisely and intelligibly

Program courses meet this requirement.

GEO 3: Demonstrate computational skills and mathematical reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

GEO 4: Demonstrate scientific reasoning

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 253

This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

GEO 5: Understand human behavior and social systems, and the principles which govern them

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

GEO 6: Understand aesthetic experience and artistic creativity

Choose one of the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
ART 111 Art History: Prehistoric to 1400 3 ENG 085, ENG 091

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art and architecture from prehistoric times to 1400.

ART 112 Art History: Renaissance to Present 3 ENG 085*

This course is a survey of art history and aesthetics covering art from the Renaissance through the 20th century.

ENG 210 Introduction to Film 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to film as a visual art and to basic film terms and techniques, such as composition, movement, editing and sound. Readings in film history, genre, theory and criticism. Includes JC Winter Film Series.

ENG 246 Short Story & Novel 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to traditional and contemporary fictional genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and the critical analysis of narrative art. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 247 Poetry & Drama 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students are introduced to lyric and dramatic genres. This course emphasizes understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of poetry and theatre as language performances and literary forms. Selections for study are chosen from English and American literature as well as world literature in translation.

ENG 252 Shakespeare 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students read representative plays and are introduced to the Elizabethan world. Course emphasizes developing understanding, appreciation and critical analysis skills.

ENG 254 Children’s Literature 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students survey the various genres of children’s literature from a critical point of view. Course emphasizes developing student competency in oral reading and presentation of children’s literature.

ENG 255 American Literature-19th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the development of a distinctive American literature and culture during the 19th century. Students read selections from many writers, with emphasis on major figures such as Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Whitman, Douglass and Jacobs.

ENG 256 American Literature-20th Century 3 ENG 085* and ENG 131

Students examine the literature and culture of America from 1890 to the present, with emphasis on the development of organic and post-modern writing in narrative, poetic and critical modes.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

MUS 131 Understanding Music 3 ENG 085*

Lecture and directed listening on the elements, forms and historic chronology of Western music.

THR 116 Introduction to Theatre 3 ENG 085*

Survey of Western theatre and drama. Appreciation of theatre through understanding of historical development and societal function. Theatre architecture, production, costuming and acting styles, and the artists who create them.

GEO 7: Understand and respect the diversity and interdependence of the world’s peoples and cultures

Program courses meet this requirement.

RELATED REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

NRS 116 Pharmacology 3 MAT 133 and BIO 132, LPN/MOA 141 or BIO 254

This course introduces students to basic principles of drug actions and nursing implications within the framework of the nursing process. Students will develop clinical reasoning and drug computation skills necessary to safely administer medications in a culturally responsive, client-centered manner.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

Take the following:

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
NRS 110 Nursing Fundamentals 5 Admission into the NURS.AAS program

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of professional nursing and the nursing process. It is designed to teach students to utilize evidence-based practice in providing client-centered and culturally responsive care, advocate for the safety and well-being of clients, develop sound clinical reasoning, promote a spirit of inquiry, and build a strong foundation for a professional identity. Clinical experiences in the long term care facilities and in community settings are designed to reinforce theory concepts and the nursing process.

NRS 111 Nursing Skills 1 Admission into the NURS.AAS program

This course prepares students to safely and efficiently perform basic psychomotor nursing skills which are client-centered, culturally responsive and evidence-based. Classroom, laboratory and simulation experiences foster the development of clinical reasoning, a spirit of inquiry, and teamwork in preparation for the clinical experience.

NRS 119 Health Assessment 3 Admission into the NURS.AAS program

This course prepares students to conduct evidenced based, client-centered health assessments. Using a systematic and culturally responsive approach, the student will demonstrate safe assessment techniques and electronic health record documentation according to evidence-based practice. Classroom, laboratory and simulation experiences foster the development of clinical reasoning, a spirit of inquiry, and teamwork in preparation for the clinical experience.

NRS 210 Medical Surgical Nursing I 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116, NRS 119

This course prepares the student to provide cultural responsive, safe, quality care while utilizing evidenced-based clinical reasoning that meets the educational and health promotion needs of the medical-surgical client and their families. Clinical experiences, designed to reinforce theory, are included in the acute care setting.

NRS 211 Care of Women and Neonates 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116, NRS 119

This course utilizes the nursing process to assist the student in collaborating with the client/family or other health care members to provide culturally responsive care during the childrearing experience. The student will address care issues from a physiological, pathophysiological, and psychosocial context using clinical reasoning to provide safe and quality care for women and neonates. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are included in acute care clinical settings.

NRS 212 Behavioral Health 3 NRS 210, NRS 211, and NRS 215

This course prepares the student to provide culturally responsive, safe, quality care utilizing clinical reasoning when caring for clients and their families with behavioral health needs. Clinical experiences, designed to reinforce theory, practice standards, and current research, are included in both the acute care and community settings.

NRS 213 Pediatrics 3 NRS 210, NRS 211 and NRS 215

This course explores Family Centered Care (FCC) concepts according to theories of growth and development to provide culturally responsive, safe, quality care utilizing clinical reasoning in the practice of primary preventative, acute and chronic nursing care of the pediatric patient population. Digital documentation techniques along with clinical experiences designed to reinforce application of theory, practice standards, and current research are included in both the acute care and community settings.

NRS 214 Medical Surgical Nursing II 4 NRS 210, NRS 211 and NRS 215

This course prepares the student to provide cultural responsive safe, quality care while utilizing clinical reasoning to the complex medical surgical clients and their families while reinforcing health promotion. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are include in both acute care and community settings.

NRS 215 Pathophysiology 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116 and NRS 119

This course challenges student to apply the fundamental principles of pathophysiology in the management of the most relevant acute and chronic diseases within the framework of the nursing process. The student will use pathophysiology knowledge to develop sound clinical reasoning, promote a spirit of inquiry, and build a strong foundation for a professional identity.

NRS 230 Medical Surgical Nursing III 4 NRS 212, NRS 213 and NRS 214

This course prepares students to provide culturally responsive safe, quality, transitional care while utilizing nursing judgment to increasingly complex, critically ill, and/or multiple clients and their families. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are included in both acute care and community settings.

NRS 240 Nursing Capstone 4 NRS 212, NRS 213, NRS 214 and NRS 230

This course prepares students for the transition from student to graduate nurse through synthesis and evaluation of current health care trends, legal and ethical processes, and evidence based practice. Clinical preceptorships designed to integrate theory, practice and professional socialization are included.

*NRS 116 if not completed prior to admission into the program, MUST be taken during Semester I – concurrent with NRS 110 and 111.

**It is highly recommended that general education courses be taken before the nursing course sequence if at all possible.

NOTE: Nursing courses are assigned various labs and clinicals. Be sure to follow directions. The schedule is subject to change on short notice. Specific clinical sites and times cannot be guaranteed.
The nursing department reserves the right to change the curriculum, policies and program requirements.
The nursing program requirements are highly demanding and time consuming. Following admission, full-time employment is not recommended.

Sample Course Map

The following is a sample course map for informational purposes and will not suit every student’s situation. A detailed, individualized course map will be created when a student meets with their Student Success Navigator.

SEMESTER 1

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
CEM 131 Fundamentals of Chemistry 4 ENG 085* and MAT 033* or higher

Fills requirement for some non-science majors. Provides background for CEM 141 for those with no recent high school chemistry. Fundamental principles of chemistry such as states of matter, simple atomic and molecular structure, and the periodic classification of elements. The study of water emphasizes the properties of solutions and acid-base relations. Course includes a laboratory component.

PNC 100 Body Structure & Function 4 ENG 085*

(SAME AS MOA 141) This course is a body systems approach to the body structures and functions providing a foundation of understanding normal and abnormal body functions and disease processes.

MOA 120 Medical Terminology 3 ENG 085*

A programmed learning word building system approach is used to teach basic medical terminology word roots, prefixes, suffixes, language origins, plural formation and grammar rules are studied. Emphasis is placed on word building, definitions, spelling, usage, pronunciation and acceptable medical abbreviations.

SEM 140 Seminar in Life Pathways 3

Seminar in Life Pathways is a gateway course to Jackson College. This course is designed to help all students develop the skills, inner qualities and external behaviors needed to take charge of their academic and career success. Students will be guided through an extensive process in making career choices and selecting an academic program of study at Jackson College and beyond. With the exception of second-admit programs, SEM 140 is required of all students.

SEMESTER 2

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 253 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

This is the first course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes introductions to basic chemistry, biology and histology and extends to the survey of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. A strong background in biology and/or chemistry is highly recommended.

ENG 131 Writing Experience I 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This is an intensive writing course. Narrative and descriptive modes are stressed. Basic research strategies are introduced. An end-of-the-semester portfolio is required.

MAT 133 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 4 MAT 033* or MAT 131 or higher

(FORMERLY MTH 133) (SAME AS CIS 203 AND PSY 144) This course is an introduction to experimental design, data representation, basic descriptive statistics, probability theorems, frequency distributions and functions, binomial and normal probability distributions and functions, probability density functions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, Chi-square analysis, linear regression, correlation and application of the above in making informed, data driven decisions in real-world contexts. Both graphing calculators and computer-based statistical software (Microsoft® Excel) will be used. If the prerequisite is more than two years old, then the mathematics department recommends the course placement exam be taken or the prerequisite be retaken to ensure the success of the student.

PSY 140 Introduction to Psychology 4 ENG 085* and ENG 090*

Overview of the field of psychology, including learning, development, emotion, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy.

SEMESTER 3

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
BIO 220 Microbiology 4 ENG 085* and MAT 020* or higher

Basic structure and function of microorganisms with special emphasis on recent advances in microbiology, pathogens, disease, control and immunity. Strong biology background recommended. Course includes a laboratory component.

BIO 254 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 253

This is the second course of a two-semester course sequence in which students study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course includes the autonomic nervous system, sensory, motor, and integrative systems, special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular systems, lymphatic system and immunity, respiratory systems, digestive system, metabolism and nutrition, urinary system and reproductive systems. This course includes a laboratory component in which students are responsible for performing dissections and making original observations on dissected material. The laboratory experience culminates with the use of a plastinated human specimen for observation. Because physiological processes are based on the principles of chemistry, prior chemistry coursework is strongly recommended for this course.

HUM 131 Cultural Connections 3 ENG 085 and ENG 091

This interdisciplinary course examines contemporary issues, their human and technological components, and their historical precedents through art, music, literature and philosophy.

SEMESTER 4

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
NRS 110 Nursing Fundamentals 5 Admission into the NURS.AAS program

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of professional nursing and the nursing process. It is designed to teach students to utilize evidence-based practice in providing client-centered and culturally responsive care, advocate for the safety and well-being of clients, develop sound clinical reasoning, promote a spirit of inquiry, and build a strong foundation for a professional identity. Clinical experiences in the long term care facilities and in community settings are designed to reinforce theory concepts and the nursing process.

NRS 116 Pharmacology 3 MAT 133 and BIO 132, LPN/MOA 141 or BIO 254

This course introduces students to basic principles of drug actions and nursing implications within the framework of the nursing process. Students will develop clinical reasoning and drug computation skills necessary to safely administer medications in a culturally responsive, client-centered manner.

NRS 119 Health Assessment 3 Admission into the NURS.AAS program

This course prepares students to conduct evidenced based, client-centered health assessments. Using a systematic and culturally responsive approach, the student will demonstrate safe assessment techniques and electronic health record documentation according to evidence-based practice. Classroom, laboratory and simulation experiences foster the development of clinical reasoning, a spirit of inquiry, and teamwork in preparation for the clinical experience.

SEMESTER 5

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
NRS 210 Medical Surgical Nursing I 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116, NRS 119

This course prepares the student to provide cultural responsive, safe, quality care while utilizing evidenced-based clinical reasoning that meets the educational and health promotion needs of the medical-surgical client and their families. Clinical experiences, designed to reinforce theory, are included in the acute care setting.

NRS 215 Pathophysiology 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116 and NRS 119

This course challenges student to apply the fundamental principles of pathophysiology in the management of the most relevant acute and chronic diseases within the framework of the nursing process. The student will use pathophysiology knowledge to develop sound clinical reasoning, promote a spirit of inquiry, and build a strong foundation for a professional identity.

NRS 211 Care of Women and Neonates 4 NRS 110, NRS 111, NRS 116, NRS 119

This course utilizes the nursing process to assist the student in collaborating with the client/family or other health care members to provide culturally responsive care during the childrearing experience. The student will address care issues from a physiological, pathophysiological, and psychosocial context using clinical reasoning to provide safe and quality care for women and neonates. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are included in acute care clinical settings.

SEMESTER 6

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
NRS 214 Medical Surgical Nursing II 4 NRS 210, NRS 211 and NRS 215

This course prepares the student to provide cultural responsive safe, quality care while utilizing clinical reasoning to the complex medical surgical clients and their families while reinforcing health promotion. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are include in both acute care and community settings.

NRS 213 Pediatrics 3 NRS 210, NRS 211 and NRS 215

This course explores Family Centered Care (FCC) concepts according to theories of growth and development to provide culturally responsive, safe, quality care utilizing clinical reasoning in the practice of primary preventative, acute and chronic nursing care of the pediatric patient population. Digital documentation techniques along with clinical experiences designed to reinforce application of theory, practice standards, and current research are included in both the acute care and community settings.

NRS 212 Behavioral Health 3 NRS 210, NRS 211, and NRS 215

This course prepares the student to provide culturally responsive, safe, quality care utilizing clinical reasoning when caring for clients and their families with behavioral health needs. Clinical experiences, designed to reinforce theory, practice standards, and current research, are included in both the acute care and community settings.

SEMESTER 7

Course # Course Name Credits Prerequisites Notes
NRS 240 Nursing Capstone 4 NRS 212, NRS 213, NRS 214 and NRS 230

This course prepares students for the transition from student to graduate nurse through synthesis and evaluation of current health care trends, legal and ethical processes, and evidence based practice. Clinical preceptorships designed to integrate theory, practice and professional socialization are included.

NRS 230 Medical Surgical Nursing III 4 NRS 212, NRS 213 and NRS 214

This course prepares students to provide culturally responsive safe, quality, transitional care while utilizing nursing judgment to increasingly complex, critically ill, and/or multiple clients and their families. Clinical experiences designed to reinforce theory are included in both acute care and community settings.